From Our Own Borealis Blog

Turning science into stories: the craft of Ed Yong

By Robert Gooding-Townsend, Science in Society Co-editor Last October, at the height of the American presidential election, the internet was […]

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Part 2: Updates on the Little Glass Time Machines – Sexwamin and the Bohemian Blown-Glass Beads

Pic: the medium sized beads of clear glass with an indeterminate interior colour Recently my field season in BC came and went by in a blur of time.  It was a busy, but rewarding season on the Sunshine Coast, working with the shíshálh Nation and the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project.  Our time was again spent excavating Snake Bay (which will be featured in a fantastic television show’s upcoming second season).  We also spent a significant amount…

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A look into a rumen

Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus)Dietary choices are central to our understanding of ecology and evolution. Still, many aspects of food choice have been hampered by time consuming procedures and methodological problems. Faster and cheaper methods, such as DNA metabarcoding, have therefore been widely adopted.Traditional visual techniques based on morphology for diet analysis are often limited in their ability to identify all items found in a stomach. Unrecognizable content has to be ignored which can shift relative proportions…

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Congratulations, you graduated this year! So, what happens next?

Dr. Amir Manbachi, Johns Hopkins University (with permission) Passing by university campuses in the month of June, what you will notice is joyful, well dressed students, accompanied by family members, attending their graduation ceremonies. It is indeed a great feeling to have accomplished a university degree after a lot of dedication and hard work. I personally prefer the name commencement instead of graduation ceremony. After all, even though students graduate and end a significant stage…

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Ten Ways to Listen to Trees

“Trees are full of song,” writes David George Haskell in the May 10 online issue of Scientific American. “Wind clatters and hisses through leaves and needles, insects stridulate, ice rends weakened wood, people chatter on the street below, and mechanical noises reverberate within trunks.” Haskell’s new book “The Songs of Trees”, explores the science and ethics of a dozen trees around the world. A professor of biology at The University of the South, he tells…

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Searching for a new home

My partner and I have been searching for a new house recently. It is considered a “seller’s” market here where houses that are listed in the morning have accepted offers by the evening. It is frustrating how fast houses sell, but at least we are in a good place where we don’t need to move immediately. However, what about when your home has been destroyed or it has disappeared? With all of the wildfires across…

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Women in Physics: Dr. Victoria Kaspi

This post is part of an ongoing series by Jenny Kliever about women in physics who have inspired others and contributed to the field in unique and impressive ways. The Canadian Journal of Physics will be publishing a special issue on Women in Physics later in 2017. Keep up to date on all CJP activities by signing up for the CJP newsletter. A logical thinker and always ready for a challenge, Victoria Kaspi chose to…

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Why your Kingston Shoreline Story is important.

Photo: Lake Ontario Waterkeeper The Shoreline Shuffle Salute Exhibit opened this past Saturday at the Tett Centre for Creativity and Learning. It was a beautiful day to remember the success of the 2013 Shoreline Shuffle, and to build on the progress of the original event with a community collection of Kingston Waterfront Stories.The exhibit showcased photos from the original shuffle, and gathered key organizers Dave McDonald, Su Sheedy, and Mary Farrar.Part photography exhibit and part…

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