The Science of Perspective

I have recently been informed that this blog is now a year and a half old. How this happened, I have absolutely no idea, but I’ll do my best to make sure it doesn’t happen again. That said, my first ever post on this blog was a profile on one of my mentors and idols in the world of science communication: Dan Riskin. I had a chance to interview Dan earlier this year for the…

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It’s Time To Move On

Note: Please excuse the spacing, or suspicious lack thereof. This internet thing is hard sometimes. It’s time for a discussion about religious beliefs. This isn’t a conversation I often have outside the company of close friends, but I found a perspective this week that quite appealed to me, and I figured this would be a good place to share my thoughts. I am not religious. Nor would I consider myself particularly spiritual. That said, I’ve never particularly identified…

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There Ain’t No Carrot Like a Snow Carrot

Generally, science and I are friends. But sometimes, science says things that make me roll my eyes. Usually, these things involve cats, but occasionally I come across a gem like this one: Mysterious ‘Snow Carrots’ Observed at Meteorite Impact Sites Before I go on to make fun of every word in this article’s title, I do want to point out that this is a legitimate scientific discovery presented at the 46th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, which seems…

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What’s on Tap?

Whenever I tell people I work with water, one of the first questions I get asked is whether tap water is safe to drink. For people in the Metro Vancouver area, this link does a great job summarizing the water supply process from source to tap. For those of you living elsewhere, this information should be easy enough to find on Google by searching ‘water treatment and supply’ and your town or city name. In…

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Earth: A Love Story

Welcome to Earth. What is Earth? Earth is a rather large, reasonably spherical space rock that flies around a giant ball of fire at approximately 107,000 kilometers per hour. Who am I? You are a human. Humans, or homo sapiens, are awkwardly uncoordinated bipedal organisms who believe that the world revolves around them. What happens next? In all likelihood, something terrible. Is there cause for alarm? Perhaps. I’m still working on that one, but might have an answer for you next week.…

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It’s Alive!

THIS IS AN UPDATE As some of you might have noticed, Mostly Harmless Science has undergone a lacuna. An unconformity. A discontinuity. A hiatus. A gap. I could throw out some excuses, but instead, I will bribe you with a list of UNESCO’s newest World Heritage Sites. The temporal rift outlined above has yielded several interesting (at least to me) updates. 1. Another degree? Check. Feel free to enjoy a one-line summary of my thesis. 2.…

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Treasures of the Deep

When you think of legendary cities hidden beneath the ocean waves, Atlantis is undoubtedly the first name that springs to mind. Yet the ocean floor is home to a remarkable array of elaborate structures, many of them created not by humans but by natural processes. In 2000, a formation of towering pillars and columns was discovered in the Atlantic Ocean and christened the Lost City. It has since garnered significant research and media attention and was prominently featured in the…

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Who Shot the Reindeer?

The gossip columns of newspapers and magazines are always full of the latest scoop on sports stars, rockers, and Hollywood celebs. I’m a great lover of gossip, but the juicy tidbits I like to know often take a little more digging than lifting the remote control. Lately, I’ve been wondering whether early humans in North America believed in Santa Claus. I wanted the scoop, the whole scoop, and nothing but the scoop, so I did…

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It’s Always Easter on Easter Island

It’s always Easter on Easter Island, said nobody ever.  Although truth be told, the name was coined by a Dutch explorer after landing on the island on Easter Sunday in 1722. He later went on to name nearby islands ‘Christmas’ and ‘Thanksgiving’ before realizing that he should spend more holidays at home with his wife and children. Yes, I’ll admit I might’ve stretched the truth a little. Obviously, everyone knows that there are no islands close to Easter…

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Chasing Carbon: Why the World Needs Carbon Capture

Author’s note: This article is NOT meant to question the importance of reducing our long-term reliance on fossil fuels as energy sources. Alternative energy measures, emissions regulations, and climate treaties are not only necessary but vital. This article’s purpose is to examine the very real threat of what should happen if these options fail. It seems that the concept of climate change has become synonymous with ‘doomsday’. To hear the story told, we’re on a runaway freight train…

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