An Unsolicited Guide to Writing an Archaeology Blog Post

Pic: In my almost two years of blogging I’ve written 41 posts and it’s definitely been a learning experience getting to that point! There is no doubt that blogs are popular. They have an enormous reach, with approximately 88 million posts being published and around 409 million people reading blog posts every month (these stats are specific to WordPress, which is one of, if not the most popular blog-hosting service) Blogs are everywhere, sometimes hosted by…

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Digging in the Wrong Place: “Undiscovered”

Pic: Tutankhamun’s iconic funerary mask Undiscovered; Treasure Hunter Security #1 – Anna Hackett (2016) It’s time for my first edition of Digging in the Wrong Place! In case you missed my initial post about it, my plan is simple: I’m going to read a bunch of books (mostly fiction) involving archaeology and then talk about the archaeology involved, paying careful attention to what the authors get wrong. And then I’ll explain why it’s wrong. It’ll be fun, I…

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Sprinkling some Grains of Salt on Ice Bridge

Pic: Still from the documentary On January 14th, 2018, the popular CBC program “The Nature of Things” aired an hour-long documentary titled, Ice Bridge. This documentary sought out to explore in detail the Solutrean Hypothesis, the brain-child of archaeologists Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley. Well, in fairness the hypothesis came about in the 1930’s but quickly died out. Stanford and Bradley have since resurrected it. This hypothesis states that the first people to settle in the…

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Knowledge Feature: Pseudoarchaeology

Pic: Image from Jason Colavito’s blog discussion on a 2017 study into American beliefs by Chapman University If you’ve read about the new blog series I’ll be starting in 2018, “Digging in the Wrong Place”, than you definitely saw the word ‘pseudoarchaeology’. Maybe you’ve even heard of it from other sources, or under other names (fringe archaeology, alternative archaeology, cult archaeology). Simply put, pseudoarchaeology refers to archaeological theories and/or interpretations that are rejected by the…

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Knowledge Feature: Pseudoarchaeology

Pic: Image from Jason Colavito’s blog discussion on a 2017 study into American beliefs by Chapman University If you’ve read about the new blog series I’ll be starting in 2018, “Digging in the Wrong Place”, than you definitely saw the word ‘pseudoarchaeology’. Maybe you’ve even heard of it from other sources, or under other names (fringe archaeology, alternative archaeology, cult archaeology). Simply put, pseudoarchaeology refers to archaeological theories and/or interpretations that are rejected by the…

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Celebrating The Femmes of Archaeology – 2017 Edition

Written by: Dani Bradford, Steph Halmhofer, and Nikki Martensen *Authors and contributors listed in alphabetical order **Featured image from Steph Halmhofer   It all started with a suggestion on Twitter by @ArchyFantasies to start a “femmes of archaeology support group”. The support group began on Twitter and then quickly moved to Slack to allow for more people to join, as the response to the group was overwhelmingly positive. Initial conversation turned to the inclusion of…

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“Digging in the Wrong Place” – A New Series for 2018

Pic: The inspiration for this blog series title, from Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark (Image borrowed from a website about a map program) It’s no secret that archaeology is often a popular topic for fictional movies and books.  But it’s also no secret that fictional movies and books get a lot wrong about archaeology. The discipline had been romanticized in a way, with grand ideas of gold fortunes, unleashed curses, and monsters hidden away for…

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What to Do if You Encounter an Archaeologist in the Wild

Pic: Me, sitting in my unit in BC recording some level depths, something you’ll often see archaeologists doing. Imagine you’re out for a walk in a National park and you come across a team of archaeologists on an excavation.  Do you talk to them?  Do you keep walking past? What if you run into one of them in the washroom?  What happens if you make eye contact? For anyone who has visited Point Pelee National…

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Knowledge Feature – X-Ray Fluorescence

Pic: The extra-large beads from Sexwamin If you follow me on Twitter or read this blog on a regular basis, you have definitely heard me talking about blown-glass (B-G) beads.  If you’re new to my blog and find yourself wondering what I’m talking about, I’ll summarize briefly: I uncovered some super rare B-G beads on an archaeological site in BC that I studied for my MA thesis.  Based on specific manufacturing characteristics on these beads I…

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What’s Up Next on the Archaeological Horizon?

Pic: Me with my super serious archaeologist face doing some super serious archaeology work in the lab. I finished my Masters thesis.  Written, polished, submitted, and accepted kind of done.  Which is kind of crazy for me, since it’s been a goal I’ve been working towards for the past 5 years.  I’m still in a little bit of disbelief that I’m actually finished!  So, I guess the next question is, “now what?”  I was worried…

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