Progress on biodiversity-ecosystem function requires looking back

Williams, L. J., et al. 2017. Spatial complementarity in tree crowns explains overyielding in species mixtures. - Nature Ecology & Evolution 1: 0063.It seems at times that the focus on whether biodiversity has a positive relationship with ecosystem functioning has been a bit limiting. Questions about the BEF relationships are important, of course, since they support arguments for protecting biodiversity and suggests a cost of failing to do so. But as a hypothesis ('higher diversity…

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Data management for complete beginners

Bill Michener is a longtime advocate of data management and archiving practices for ecologists, and I was lucky to catch him giving talk on the topic this week. It clarified for me the value of formalizing data management plans for institutions and lab groups, but also the gap between recommendations for best practices in data management and the reality in many labs. Michener started his talk with two contrasting points. First, we are currently deluged…

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Archiving the genomes of all species

There is so much bad news about global biodiversity, that it is nice to hear about new undertakings and approaches. One of these is the 'Earth BioGenome Project' which proposes to sequence the genomes of the entirety of life on earth. Given that sequencing services have never been more affordable and more available to scientists, without question, though ambitious this is a feasible undertaking. Still, with perhaps 9 million eukaryotes on the planet, a rough prediction suggests…

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When is the same trait not the same?

Different clades and traits yield similar grassland functional responses. 2016. Elisabeth J. Forrestel, Michael J. Donoghue,  Erika J. Edwards,  Walter Jetz,  Justin C. O. du Toite, and Melinda D. Smith. vol. 114 no. 4, 705–710, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1612909114A potential benefit of trait-centric approaches is that they may provide a path to generality in community ecology. Functional traits affect growth, reproduction, and survival, and so--indirectly--should determine an organism's fitness; differences in functional traits may delineate niche differences. Since…

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The removal of the predatory journal list means the loss of necessary information for scholars.

We at EEB & Flow periodically post about trends and issues in scholarly publishing, and one issue that we keep coming back to is the existence of predatory Open Access journals. These are journals that abuse a valid publishing model to make a quick buck and use standards that are clearly substandard and are meant to subvert the normal scholarly publishing pipeline (for example, see: here, here and here). In identifying those journals that, though…

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True, False, or Neither? Hypothesis testing in ecology.

How science is done is the outcome of many things, from training (both institutional and lab specific), reviewers’ critiques and requests, historical practices, subdiscipline culture and paradigms, to practicalities such as time, money, and trends in grant awards. ‘Ecology’ is the emergent property of thousands of people pursuing paths driven by their own combination of these and other motivators. Not surprisingly, the path of ecology sways and stalls, and in response papers pop up continuing…

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87 years ago, in ecology

Louis Emberger was an important French plant ecologist in the first half of the last century, known for his work on the assemblages of plants in the mediterranean. For example, the plot below is his published diagram showing minimum temperature of the coolest month versus a 'pluviometric quotient' capturing several aspects of temperature and precipitation from: Emberger; La végétation de la région méditerranienne. Rev. Gén. Bot., 42 (1930)Note this wasn't an unappreciated or ignored paper…

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2016 holiday caRd

Once more, tis the season! Hope you had an excellent year of science and R coding. This card requires the igraph library - it (loosely) relies on an infection (S-I model) moving through a network :-)To view season's greetings from 2016:Go to the gist and download the file directly ("download gist") or hit "raw" and copy/paste. Or, copy and paste the code below.Users of Rstudio will not be able to see the animation, so base R is…

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150 years of ‘ecology’

The word ‘ecology’ was coined 150 years ago by Ernst Haeckel in his book Generelle Morphologie der Organismen published in 1866. Mike Begon gave a fascinating talk at the British Ecological Society meeting in Liverpool on what ecology as meant over these past 150 years and what it should mean in the future. The description of ecology that follows, is largely taken from Begon’s remarks.Ernst Haeckel, 1860Haeckel defined ecology as ‘the science of the relations…

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Can coexistence theories coexist?

These days, the term ‘niche’ manages to cover both incredibly vague and incredibly specific ideas. All the many ways of thinking about an organism’s niche fill the literature, with various degrees of inter-connection and non-independence. The two dominant descriptions in modern ecology (last 30 years or so) are from ‘contemporary niche theory’ and ‘modern coexistence theory’. Contemporary niche theory is developed from consumer-resource theory, where organisms' interactions occur via usage of shared resources. (Though it…

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