Experimental macroevolution at microscales

Sometimes I find myself defending the value of microcosms and model organisms for ecological research. Research systems do not always have to involve a perfect mimicry of nature to provide useful information. A new paper in Evolution is a great example of how microcosms provide information that may not be accessible in any other system, making them a valuable tool in ecological research.For example, macroevolutionary hypotheses are generally only testable using observational data. They suffer…

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Experimental macroevolution at microscales

Sometimes I find myself defending the value of microcosms and model organisms for ecological research. Research systems do not always have to involve a perfect mimicry of nature to provide useful information. A new paper in Evolution is a great example of how microcosms provide information that may not be accessible in any other system, making them a valuable tool in ecological research.For example, macroevolutionary hypotheses are generally only testable using observational data. They suffer…

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Problems with over-generalizing the dynamics of communities

Community ecologists talk about communities as experiencing particular processes in a rather general way. We fall into rather Clementsian language, asking whether environmental filtering dominates a community or if biotic interactions are disproportionately strong. This is in contrast to the typical theoretical focus on pairwise interactions, as it acts as though all species in a community are responding similarly to similar processes.Some approaches to community ecology have eschewed this generality, particularly those that focus on…

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Problems with over-generalizing the dynamics of communities

Community ecologists talk about communities as experiencing particular processes in a rather general way. We fall into rather Clementsian language, asking whether environmental filtering dominates a community or if biotic interactions are disproportionately strong. This is in contrast to the typical theoretical focus on pairwise interactions, as it acts as though all species in a community are responding similarly to similar processes.Some approaches to community ecology have eschewed this generality, particularly those that focus on…

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The most “famous” ecologists (and some time wasting links)

At some point my officemates Matthias and Pierre and I started playing the 'who is the most famous ecologist' game (instead of, say, doing useful work), particular looking for ecologists with an h-index greater than 100. An h-index of 100 would mean that the scientist had 100 publications with at least 100 citations  and their other papers had less than 100 citations. Although the h-index is controversial, it is readily available and reasonably capture scientists that have…

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The most “famous” ecologists (and some time wasting links) (Updated)

(Update: This has gotten lots more attention than I expected. Since first posted, the top 10 list has been updated 2 times based on commenters suggestions. You can also see everyone we looked up here. Probably I won't update this again, because there is a little time wasting, and there is a lot of time wasting :) )At some point my officemates Matthias and Pierre and I started playing the 'who is the most famous…

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Biodiversity conservation in a human world: do successes involve losses?

Its become commonplace to state that the world is in the midst of a mass extinction event. And there is no doubt about the cause. Unlike previous mass extinction events, like the cretaceous extinction event that saw most dinosaurs disappear, the current extinction event is not caused by a geological or astrological event. Rather, the current extinction event is caused by a single species, humans. Through habitat destruction, wildlife harvesting, pollution, and the introduction of…

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Progress on biodiversity-ecosystem function requires looking back

Williams, L. J., et al. 2017. Spatial complementarity in tree crowns explains overyielding in species mixtures. - Nature Ecology & Evolution 1: 0063.It seems at times that the focus on whether biodiversity has a positive relationship with ecosystem functioning has been a bit limiting. Questions about the BEF relationships are important, of course, since they support arguments for protecting biodiversity and suggests a cost of failing to do so. But as a hypothesis ('higher diversity…

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Data management for complete beginners

Bill Michener is a longtime advocate of data management and archiving practices for ecologists, and I was lucky to catch him giving talk on the topic this week. It clarified for me the value of formalizing data management plans for institutions and lab groups, but also the gap between recommendations for best practices in data management and the reality in many labs. Michener started his talk with two contrasting points. First, we are currently deluged…

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Archiving the genomes of all species

There is so much bad news about global biodiversity, that it is nice to hear about new undertakings and approaches. One of these is the 'Earth BioGenome Project' which proposes to sequence the genomes of the entirety of life on earth. Given that sequencing services have never been more affordable and more available to scientists, without question, though ambitious this is a feasible undertaking. Still, with perhaps 9 million eukaryotes on the planet, a rough prediction suggests…

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