Reminder: Abstract deadline ends in 10 days

The 7th International Barcode of  Life Conference will be held from November 20 - 24, 2017 at the Nombolo Mdhluli Conference Centre, Skukuza, located within the heart of African wildlife at Kruger National Park, South Africa. On March 31st the abstract submission will end and because I know that we researchers like to cut it close I like to remind you to send in your's quickly. How about setting aside a couple of minutes this week…

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Monday reads

Now back to Monday reads on a Monday. Some new studies for you to catch up.An rbcL Reference Library to Aid in the Identification of Plant Species Mixtures by DNA MetabarcodingPremise of the study: DNA metabarcoding has broad-ranging applications in ecology, aerobiology, biosecurity, and forensics. A bioinformatics pipeline has recently been published for identification using a comprehensive database of ITS2, one of the common plant DNA barcoding markers. There is, however, no corresponding database for…

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A new frog: Pristimantis attenboroughi

Credit: Dr. Edgar Lehr from publicationOne extraordinarily diverse genus of frogs, Pristimantis, includes 465 recognized species, 131 of them from Peru. The mountainous terrain of the Andes probably led to the evolution of so many different ground-dwelling frogs, in which the eggs develop directly into tiny baby frogs without going through a tadpole phase.The new species inhabits several localities across the Pui Pui Protected Forest, a nature reserve located at elevations between 3400 and 3936 m…

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Monday reads

Monday reads on a Wednesday - just the result of some conference travel. For the same reason there are a few more articles than usual. Interesting reads as always.Environmental DNA metabarcoding reveals primary chemical contaminants in freshwater sediments from different land-use types.Land-use intensification threatens freshwater biodiversity. Freshwater eukaryotic communities are affected by multiple chemical contaminants with a land-use specific manner. However, biodiversities of eukaryotes and their associations with multiple chemical contaminants are largely unknown. This…

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Metabarcoding to track indoor fungi

Environmental microbes can have both beneficial and harmful effects on health, e.g. bacterial biodiversity is discussed as a factor influencing immuntolerance. This might explain the lower incidence of allergic diseases in children living in rural environments in contrast to children living in urban environments. Rural environments are usually more diverse and researchers are particularly looking at the effect of environmental microbiota on the commensal microbiota. The latter has been shown to have a strong influence on…

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Monday reads

Last Monday was a statutory holiday here so I skipped the post. Now we're back. A couple of interesting reads for your working week.Contrasting morphological and DNA barcode-suggested species boundaries among shallow-water amphipod fauna from the southern European Atlantic coastIn this study we compared DNA barcode-suggested species boundaries with morphology-based species identifications in the amphipod fauna of the southern European Atlantic coast. DNA sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcode region (COI-5P) were…

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From the inbox

Two symposia are held back-to-back in Uppsala 11-15 Sept, 2017: the 3rd Symposium on Ecological Networks and the 3rd Symposium on Molecular Analysis of Trophic Interactions.Please note that registration is now open. To aim for a program where all attendants can participate with a talk or poster, we have opted for a two-stage process of registration. In the first stage open now, we ask you to submit a notice of interest and the abstract of…

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A new snail: Gastrocopta sharae

Credit: Dr. Rodrigo B. Salvador from publicationThe genus Gastrocopta comprises of a number of minute air-breathing land snails. These little animals usually measure less than 2 mm. They are cave-dwelling invertebrates, which in general, receive scarce attention from researchers. Given their size and the environment they live in it should come as no surprise that little is known about them. It also means that the closer researchers look the more new species they will likely find.Inspired…

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Invasions continue

For all groups of organisms on all continents, the number of alien species has increased continuously during the last 200 years. For most groups, even the rate of introduction is highest recently. Barring mammals and fishes, there are no signs of a slow-down and we have to expect more new invasions in the near future.Quite a sobering statement. However, it summarizes the results of a new study in which a large international group of researchers…

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A new plasterer bee: Lonchopria heberti

Members of the bee family Colletidae are also called plasterer bees because of their way to smooth the walls of their nest cells with secretions which dry into a cellophane-like lining. The majority of the 2000 known species in this family live in South America and Australia. No surprise that this new species was found in Chile. The species is named after the inventor of DNA barcoding: Paul Hebert who happens to be my boss. The…

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