My Brilliant Career: a woman geoscientist looks back on #IWD2017

Last November, I gave a talk to the brand new Dalhousie University Chapter of the Association of Women Geoscientists. When I asked the women what they were looking for in a talk, they weren’t very specific other than that they wanted to hear about my career as a woman in earth science. I decided to keep it light-hearted but pertinent. The feedback was positive and there was even interest from further away (thanks to a…

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New Banner picture! Cobequid-Chedabucto Fault at Cape Chignecto, Nova Scotia

Figure 1. The western extremity of the Cobequid Chedabucto Fault complex in Nova Scotia. The Cape in the distance is called Cape Chignecto It is a glorious view from the beach at Advocate Harbour. We look West towards Cape Chignecto. The coastline is straight. Eroding cliffs dip steeply down to the Bay of Fundy. This peninsula, the Cape Chignecto Peninsula, is a Provincial Park and the popular hike around it a tough three day journey. Kayaking…

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Exxon, climate change and sequence stratigraphy

My favourite periodical is the New York Review of Books. It is a high-brow magazine that contains in-depth articles by outstanding writers and thinkers on a range of topics from fundamental physics to poetry and everything in between. And excellent article in two parts – in the December 8 and December 22 2016 issues – discussed the Exxon climate change scandal. In case you missed it: Exxon (Exxon-Mobil since years, but generally known as Exxon)…

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#Katrina10. #Louisiana is still disappearing

Originally posted on EARTH SCIENCE SOCIETY: I wrote this blog post in November of 2014. I am reblogging it today, on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Land loss map of South Louisiana. Image source here. Click on image to enlarge.  Is it the weather? No fewer than three long, detailed and well-researched articles in important media discussed the continuing story of increasing land loss in South Louisiana. The Globe and Mail’s Omar el Akkad wrote…

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Why I haven’t blogged for a while: medical science and society

I am not sure that anyone has wondered why I haven’t blogged for 2 months. I certainly haven’t had a question about it, but still feel compelled to explain. I have two Earth Science and Society blogs in draft stage: one about our travels through northern Spain (geology, archeology, society, Geoparks, UNESCO WH sites – food for thought and my virtual pen). That was the original reason for the blogging break – my husband and…

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Wrong Question: can fracking be done safely?

Originally posted on EARTH SCIENCE SOCIETY: I published this post in February 2013. I have continued to add material to it, so the most recent bits of info are at the top of the page: scroll down for the original, which hasn’t been changed. February 12, 2015 Dr. David Wheeler (president of Cape Breton University), who headed the Nova Scotia (government-appointed) panel on hydraulic fracturing in 2013-2014, gave an excellent speech to the Maritimes Energy Association. It’s…

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Canadian Earth Science for @PMHarper 11 – Dino Hunt!

The preamble to this review series is here Posted today, February 12, the 206th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth and just in time for tomorrow, another #FossilFriday and another day to watch Dino Hunt! —– Bramble, K., M.E. Burns and P.J. Currie, 2014, Enhancing bonebed mapping with GIS technology using the Danek Bonebed (Upper Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon Formation, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) as a case study. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 51, p. 987–991. Cover of the December…

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Extreme tides and Winter ice

Figure 1. Winter ice on the salt marshes of Minas Basin photographed from Wolfville, Nova Scotia, March 1, 2007. View to the North.  What is an estuary? An estuary is a bay with an open connection to the sea. Rivers flow into an estuary, mixing with sea water, resulting in a brackish water environment. All estuaries that we see today came into existence after the rapid sea level rise that marked the end of the…

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Canadian Earth Science for @PMHarper 10 – a question of Iron

The preamble to this review series is here —– Halverson, G.P., F. Poitrasson, P.E. Hoffman, A. Nédélec, J.-M. Montel and J. Kirby, 2011, Fe-isotope and trace element geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic syn-glacial Rapitan iron formation. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 309, p. 100-112. The MacKenzie Mountain front in Canada’s NW Territories as seen from the river plain near Norman Wells. Image from Google Earth (Panoramio). The fieldwork for this paper was carried out in these…

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Nova Scotia’s own Great Unconformity: my new banner photo for 2015

The Angular Unconformity (U) at Nova Scotia’s Rainy Cove, separating intensely folded and faulted early Carboniferous shales and sandstones of the Horton Group (labeled ‘1’ below the unconformity) and gently inclined, undeformed sandstones and conglomerates of the Wolfville Formation (labeled ‘2’) at Rainy Cove, Nova Scotia. The unconformity in this banner photo is exposed along the eastern shores of Minas Basin (location image at the end of this post). It is one of my favourite places…

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