Planetary Surface Processes Fieldschool!

Hello everyone!This week we are busy getting prepared for field school!  Western offers a Planetary Surface Processes Field School, which is a two-week tour around Arizona and Utah to get acquainted with the geomorphological processes affecting terrestrial bodies in our solar system.  What shapes the surface of planets?  Here are the main culprits:1. Tectonics2. Volcanism3. Impact cratering4. Erosion and weathering (Includes liquid, aeolian, glacial, and gravity driven processes!)Not all planets and moons have been affected…

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LPSC Summary and Microblogging

I had the pleasure of attending the 48th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference! I submitted two abstracts this year.  One on the B.Sc. thesis work I did at Simon Fraser University on Venusian canali, and the other was on my role on the GIS and Mapping team for the Canadian Mars Analogue Sample Return Mission.  I'm very proud of both abstracts, and was delighted to be able to share my work with the broader scientific…

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SEDS Ascension

Hello hello~Two weekends ago, I had the lovely opportunity to attend a mini-conference organized by the Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS).  SEDS is, as the name implies, an international student-run organization for all things space related.  SEDS-Canada is predominantly based in Toronto and places a strong emphasis on the engineering side of the industry, largely based on student membership from the University of Toronto and nearby universities' strong engineering programs.SEDS Ascension…

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Enstatite Chondrites

Let's take a break from radar for a moment and talk about some of my past work. In the summer of 2015, I had the opportunity to take part in the Misasa International Summer Internship Program in Misasa, Japan.  The program has two branches: Geochemistry and Geophysics.  I took part in the Geochemistry program, hosted by the Pheasant Memorial Laboratory. Six of us worked as a team to analyse the compositions of three meteorite samples,…

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Radarclinometry

In starting to write the SOAR-E grant proposal to attain RADARSAT-2 images over Iran, Catherine e-mailed me her 2008 paper that uses an Iranian salt diapir as a case study.  Originally the article was just so I could get the diapir coordinates, but I started to read it and found it quite interesting.Radar topography of domes on planetary surfaces by Neish et al. (2008) introduced me to the technique of radarclinometry, which is to use radar images…

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From one desert to another

With the intent of returning to the image misregistration issue once I'm back from Québec, I've been switching gears into proposal-writing mode.Catherine and I have discussed the possibility of extending our work to compare and contrast our Axel Heiberg Island diapirs to those in the Zagros Mountains, Iran. I have frequently referred to Axel Heiberg Island as "having the second highest concentration of salt diapirs in the world".  Well, Iran has the first-highest concentration of…

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New Year and Fresh Starts

Hello everyone, and Happy New Year!I'm back at Western after a wonderful winter break with my family in Vancouver.Some general house-keeping:In my first week back, I've been doing some general "house keeping" with my data.  I'm getting myself organized by deleting duplicate and unwanted files from awry processing.  I think it is a common problem: if you are trying a new tool in ArcGIS, are processing a new dataset, or input the wrong variable, you…

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2016 American Geophyical Union Fall Meeting

Hi hi~I am very grateful to have had the opportunity to attend the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in December.  It was a great experience to meet new people, reconnect with colleagues,attend career development workshops, learn about the cutting edge of geology, geophysics, and planetary science, and have the opportunity to present my own research.This post may seem lengthy, but I'm also partially writing it as a means to refresh myself with all the events…

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The 7th Canadian Space Exploration Workshop

A fortnight ago, I had the pleasure of attending the 7th Canadian Space Exploration Worksop (CSEW).  The CSEW was a two day workshop hosted by the Canadian Space Agency in Montreal.  The purpose of this meeting is for scientists involved in Canadian space and planetary science to convene and discuss what science objectives should be prioritized over the next decade.  The Canadian Space Agency then takes these priorities into strong consideration when determining funding allocations…

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Rocky roads and smooth sailing

Hello, hello.So, as previously mentioned, the hypothesis of this project is that solubility of salt diapirs will lend them into eroding into different patterns than other sedimentary strata.  An outcome of this are rillenkaren features; grooved furrows that arise on the surfaces of inclined diapirs [1].  Because of the erosion patterns of diapirs, we expect to correlate diapirs with rougher radar signatures, and are testing this hypothesis with our new RADARSAT-2 images.  You can see…

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