Learning Catalytics workflow

Disclosure: my colleague, Georg Rieger, and I are currently in the process of securing post-doc funding to evaluate the effectiveness of Learning Catalytics and that position would be paid in part by Pearson, who owns Learning Catalytics. A whole lotta devices! I have been using Learning Catalytics, web-based “clickers on steroids” software, in a lecture course and a lab course since the start of September. In this post I want to focus on the logistical side…

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I finally got to meet my students from the international college

Last week was a historic time for us at Vantage College (the International first-year transfer College that gets 2/3 to 3/4 of my time depending on how you count it or perhaps who you ask). Our very first students evar arrived. For the past week, they have been participating in a 1500ish-student orientation program for international and aboriginal students on campus. I have been the faculty fellow for a group of 20ish students, and in addition to our…

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AAPTSM14/PERC2014: Measuring the Learning from Two-Stage Collaborative Group Exams

In an attempt to get back into semi-regular blogging, I am setting aside my pile have half-written posts and am going to share the work that I presented at the 2014 AAPT Summer Meeting and PERC 2014. Poster (link) PERC paper (link to first submission on arXiv) The quick and dirty version is that I was able to run a study, looking at the effectiveness of group exams, in a three-section course which enrolled nearly 800…

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Pre-class homework completion rates in my first-year courses

In my mind it is hard to get students to do pre-class homework (“pre-reading”) with much more than an 80% completion rate when averaged out over the term. It usually starts higher than this, but there is a slow trend toward less completion as the term wears on. After taking a more careful look at the five introductory courses in which I used pre-class assignment I have discovered that I was able to do much…

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Student collision mini-projects from my summer 2013 comp-phys course

The last course that I taught at UFV before taking a job at UBC was an online Computation Physics course. I previously posted the mini-project videos from when I ran the course in the fall and you can check that previous post to learn more about the context of these mini-projects. The overall level of creativity seems like it was a bit lower this time than last and that might be in part due to…

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Mathematica vs. Python in my Computational Physics course

This past year I taught two sections (fall and summer) of Computational Physics at UFV, which is quite a rare thing to happen at a school where we typically run 3rd and 4th year courses every other year. The course was structured so that students would get some initial exposure to both Python and Mathematica for the purposes of physics-related computational tasks, and then as the course went on they would be given more and…

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75 vs. 150

As previously mentioned, a significant component of my new job at UBC this year is curriculum design for a first year cohort that will be taking, among other things, Physics, Calculus and Chemistry, and will have English language instruction somehow embedded into the courses or the support pieces around the courses. These students are mostly prospective Math, Physics and Chemistry majors. An interesting discussion we are having right now relates to class size; specifically class…

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Help me figure out which article to write

I have had four paper proposals accepted to the journal Physics in Canada, which is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Physicists. I will only be submitting one paper and would love to hear some opinions on which one to write and submit. I will briefly summarize what they are looking for according to the call for papers and then summarize my own proposals. Note: My understanding is that the tone of these…

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I have a new job at UBC

Dear friends. I am very excited to let you know that at the end of this week I will have officially started my new job as a tenure-track instructor in the department of physics and astronomy at the University of British Columbia. This is the department from which I received my PhD, so it is sort of like going home. The department has a great nucleus of Physics Education Research researchers, dabblers and enthusiasts, and…

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