What is a sprint?

In October we're hosting our first 'code sprint'! What is that?A code sprint is a type of hackathon, in which efforts are focused around a small number of open source projects. They are related to, but not really the same as, sprints in the Scrum software development framework. They are non-competitive — the only goal is to improve the software in question, whether it's adding functionality, fixing bugs, writing tests, improving documentation, or doing any of the…

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Get out of the way

This tweet from the Ecological Society of America conference was interesting:I am currently moderating a session at #ESA2018 and was instructed by @ESA_org to ask the audience not to take photos of the presentations. This is all backwards,”. Presenters should have an opt-out “no-tweet” option instead, like @BritishEcolSoc does, not a mandatory “no-tweet” pic.twitter.com/PE8nNDwm06— Rob Salguero-Gómez (@DRobcito) August 7, 2018 This kind of thing is now new — many conferences have 'No photos' signs around…

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Life lessons from a neural network

The latest Geophysical Tutorial came out this week in The Leading Edge. It's by my friend Gram Ganssle, and it's about neural networks. Although the example in the article is not, strictly speaking, a deep net (it only has one hidden layer), it concisely illustrates many of the features of deep learning.Whilst editing the article, it struck me that some of the features of deep learning are really features of life. Maybe humans can learn…

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Results from the AAPG Machine Learning Unsession

Click here to visit the Google Doc write-up Back in May, I co-hosted a different kind of conference session — an 'unsession' — at the AAPG Annual Conference and Exhibition in Salt Lake City, Utah. It was successful in achieving its main goal, which was to show the geoscience community and AAPG organizers a new way of collaborating, networking, and producing tangible outcomes from conference sessions.It also succeeded in drawing out hundreds of ideas and…

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Visualization in Copenhagen, part 2

In Part 1, I wrote about six of the projects teams contributed at the Subsurface Hackathon in Copenhagen in June. Today I want to tell you about the rest of them. A data exploration toolTeam GeoClusterFu...n: Dan Stanton (University of Leeds), Filippo Broggini (ETH Zürich), Francois Bonneau (Nancy), Danny Javier Tapiero Luna (Equinor), Sabyasachi Dash (Cairn India), Nnanna Ijioma (geophysicist). Tech: Plotly Dash. GitHub repo.Project: The team set out to build an interactive web app — a…

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Visualization in Copenhagen, part 1

It's finally here! The round-up of projects from the Subsurface Hacakthon in Copenhagen last month. This is the first of two posts presenting the teams and their efforts, in the same random order the teams presented them at the end of the event.Subsurface data meets Pokemon GoTeam Geo Go: Karine Schmidt, Max Gribner, Hans Sturm (all from Wintershall), Stine Lærke Andersen (University of Copenhagen), Ole Johan Hornenes (University of Bergen), Per Fjellheim (Emerson), Arne Kjetil…

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Lots of news!

I can't believe it's been a month since my last post! But I've now recovered from the craziness of the spring — with its two hackathons, two conferences, two new experiments, as well as the usual courses and client projects — and am ready to start getting back to normal. My goal with this post is to tell you all the exciting stuff that's happened in the last few weeks.Meet our newest team memberThere's a new…

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Code Show version 1.0

Last week we released Code Show version 1.0. In a new experiment, we teamed up with Total and the European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers at the EAGE Annual Conference and Exhibition in Copenhagen. Our goal was to bring a little of the hackathon to as many conference delegates as possible. We succeeded in reaching a few hundred people over the three days, making a lot of new friends in the process. See the action in…

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Big open data… or is it?

Huge news for data scientists and educators. Equinor, the company formerly known as Statoil, has taken a bold step into the open data arena. On Thursday last week, it 'disclosed' all of its subsurface and production data for the Volve oil field, located in the North Sea. What's in the data package?A lot! The 40,000-file package contains 5TB of data, that's 5,000GB! This collection is substantially larger, both deeper and broader, than any other open subsurface dataset…

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Visualize this!

The Copenhagen edition of the Subsurface Hackathon is over! For three days during the warmest June in Denmark for over 100 years, 63 geoscientists and programmers cooked up hot code in the Rainmaking Loft, one of the coolest, and warmest, coworking spaces you've ever seen. As always, every one of the participants brought their A game, and the weekend flew by in a blur of creativity, coffee, and collaboration. And croissants. Pierre enjoying the Meta…

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