Paleontology from an Amateur Perspective 1

I have the great opportunity to write about paleontology. Paleontology is something I’ve always wanted to be involved with, but it’s something I never pursued academically. I have acquired several books on the subject that I have studied, and once I exhausted those resources, I stopped. Life got in the way and my dinosaur knowledge, beyond Jurassic Park, stagnated. I’ve since received my B.A. in Creative Writing from Southern New Hampshire University. From there it…

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That’s a Wrap – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 19, THE END!

Well we’re finally here, only a few months late, at my final post and final 9 bits about Canadian palaeontology. For my last post, I’m going to focus on Saskatchewan and Yukon, two areas I managed to ignore a bit through my previous posts. These are by no means less interesting or important that what I’ve talked about, just slipped my mind and couldn’t figure out where to fit things in. So without further delay,…

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Northern pterosaurs – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 18

In the series of 150 things about Canadian palaeontology, I haven’t touched on the one thing I work on very much: pterosaurs. This is for a few reasons, one is that I’ve kind of covered this before, but also because there really just aren’t a lot. For this reason, this post is going to be short, but I’m going to hit a few of my favourites. So, starting with 137/150, what pterosaurs have been found…

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Where can I study palaeo in Canada? – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 17

Slacking again a bit on the blog posts due to my new job and trying to finish my PhD corrections (which I’ll talk about soon), but I am determined to get this series done! Continuing on with my 150 things about Canadian palaeo series, I thought it would be interesting to talk about some of the different universities that allow you to study palaeontology in Canada. Starting with 126/150: 126. I think the most obvious…

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Episode 82: Dinosaurs of China

‘Dinosaurs of China’ at Wollaton Hall, Nottingham, UK,  is a one-time only world exclusive exhibition of dinosaurs. Featuring fossils and specimens never before seen outside of Asia, the collection brings to life the story of how dinosaurs evolved into the birds that live alongside us today. With its curators, Dr Adam Smith and Dr Wang Qi, we’re provided with insights into how this exhibition was pulled off and are given a full guided tour. For…

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Episode 81: Coccolithophores

Coccolithophores are tiny unicellular eukaryotic phytoplankton (algae). Each is covered with even smaller calcium carbonate plates called coccoliths and it is these that are commonly preserved in the fossil record. In fact, coccoliths are so small, and can be so common, that they have been able to be employed in areas other than academia. Joining us is Dr Liam Gallagher, Director Network Stratigraphic Limited and a nannoplankton specialist. In this episode, he explains what coccolithophores…

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International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition

The International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition took place in St. John’s, Newfoundland, in June 2017. The ISECT meeting brought together 150 researchers working on aspects of the stratigraphy, sedimentology, geochemistry and palaeobiology of the Ediacaran and Cambrian Systems. Paleoenvironmental distribution and taphonomic diversity of terminal Ediacaran macrofossils: Insights from the Shibantan Member (China) and the Khatyspyt Formation (Siberia) Xiao, S.*, Pang, K., Bykova, N., Chen, Z., Zhou, C., Yuan, X., Grazhdankin, D.V., and Kaufman,…

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Miguasha National Park – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 16

I have been slacking a bit (ok a lot) in getting through the 150 things about Canadian palaeo series, but I’m determined to get through 150 facts before the end of this year, while it’s still Canada’s 150th birthday year! For this post, I’m going to focus on Miguasha National Park, located in Quebec, and the 5th (and final) of Canada’s palaeontologically significant UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Starting at 118/150: 118. Located on the Gaspé Peninsula of…

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SVPCA 2017

The 65th Symposium on Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy (SVPCA), University of Birmingham. All times are UTC+1. #SVPCA2017 Tweets WEDNESDAY 13TH SEPTEMBER SESSION 3 9:15–9:30 Joseph Keating et al. – EARLY CAMBRIAN OSTRACODERMS AND THE TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS OF TOTAL EVIDENCE DATING 9:30–9:45 Emma Randle & Robert Sansom – A NOVEL PHYLOGENY FOR THE HETEROSTRACI: EVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIPS OF EXTINCT JAWLESS VERTEBRATES ON THE GNATHOSTOME STEM 9:45–10:00 Zerina Johanson et al. – FUSION IN THE VERTEBRAL…

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Onwards and upwards! SVP, PhD and more…

The last month and a half have been a whirlwind for me, hence the lack of blog posts. Here’s a bit about what I’ve been up to, and what’s next for me. After submitting my thesis in July, I immediately started working on my talk for SVP, the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology annual meeting, which was Aug. 23-26 in Calgary. I was fortunate enough to be giving a talk in the Romer Prize session, a…

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