Miguasha National Park – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 16

I have been slacking a bit (ok a lot) in getting through the 150 things about Canadian palaeo series, but I’m determined to get through 150 facts before the end of this year, while it’s still Canada’s 150th birthday year! For this post, I’m going to focus on Miguasha National Park, located in Quebec, and the 5th (and final) of Canada’s palaeontologically significant UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Starting at 118/150: 118. Located on the Gaspé Peninsula of…

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SVPCA 2017

The 65th Symposium on Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy (SVPCA), University of Birmingham. All times are UTC+1. #SVPCA2017 Tweets WEDNESDAY 13TH SEPTEMBER SESSION 3 9:15–9:30 Joseph Keating et al. – EARLY CAMBRIAN OSTRACODERMS AND THE TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS OF TOTAL EVIDENCE DATING 9:30–9:45 Emma Randle & Robert Sansom – A NOVEL PHYLOGENY FOR THE HETEROSTRACI: EVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIPS OF EXTINCT JAWLESS VERTEBRATES ON THE GNATHOSTOME STEM 9:45–10:00 Zerina Johanson et al. – FUSION IN THE VERTEBRAL…

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Onwards and upwards! SVP, PhD and more…

The last month and a half have been a whirlwind for me, hence the lack of blog posts. Here’s a bit about what I’ve been up to, and what’s next for me. After submitting my thesis in July, I immediately started working on my talk for SVP, the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology annual meeting, which was Aug. 23-26 in Calgary. I was fortunate enough to be giving a talk in the Romer Prize session, a…

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Episode 80: Paleocreations

We’ve covered how palaeoart is made on Palaeocast before, but never what daily life is like for a professional palaeoartist. What does it take to get started, when can you say no to a commission and which factors come in to play when deciding how much to quote? Joining us for this episode is Bob Nicholls of Paleocreations “A Lesson Learned” – The following images document the stages of production of a piece of artwork…

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Bizarre Archosauromorph Shares Traits with Ceratopsians, Sauropods and Cows

My friends know me as a theropod fanboy, which should come to no surprise, as I am a massive cliché of a palaeontologist (unashamedly so, as theropods are beyond cool). However, give me a weird archosauromorph and I might crack out a few lines from Django Unchained: “you had my curiosity, but now you have my attention”. The Middle Triassic saw a flurry of evolution following the catastrophic, and borderline biblical, Permian-Triassic extinction event. The…

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Evidence of Intense Predation Pressures on Ancient Megafauna

Biology is full of exciting avenues, and some of the finest, in my opinion, are the morphological and behavioural adaptations that define the split seconds whether an animal lives or dies, eats or starves. Predator-prey interactions are extremely exciting- not only visually (I strongly recommend watching the BBC’s The Hunt)- but they also play an important role in the dynamics of biological systems. Some of you may remember the announcement of an exquisitely preserved nodosauid…

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Evidence of Intense Predation Pressures on Ancient Megafauna

Biology is full of exciting avenues, and some of the finest, in my opinion, are the morphological and behavioural adaptations that define the split seconds whether an animal lives or dies, eats or starves. Predator-prey interactions are extremely exciting- not only visually (I strongly recommend watching the BBC’s The Hunt)- but they also play an important role in the dynamics of biological systems. Some of you may remember the announcement of an exquisitely preserved nodosauid…

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Episode 79: Late Devonian Vertebrates

The transition of fins to limbs is one of the most significant in the history of vertebrate evolution. These were the first steps that would eventually allow tetrapods to go on to dominate so many terrestrial ecosystems. Fossils that help fill the gaps in this crucial time are invaluable, so how do we go about finding them and what happens when we do discover one? Joining us to give an overview of some of the…

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Palaeocast Art Competition 2017

The Palaeocast art competition is back and we’ve got another great selection of prizes up for grabs this year. We have five models from Paleozoo, five prints from palaeoartist Bob Nicholls and some VNHM posters! We’ll be running the competition on Facebook and Twitter for the whole month of August using #palaeocastart. To enter, simply: Email your original artwork to us, along with a name and title (please state if you are <16). Palaeocast then uploads it to Facebook…

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Playing Doctor with Titanosaurs

Titanosaurs include some of the largest terrestrial organisms to walk the Earth: globally distributed, multi-tonne behemoths representing the last of the sauropods at the end Cretaceous extinction event. Much about their biology is known, ranging from nesting behaviour to the skin texture of their embryos. Yet the impact of pathologies on these animals is enigmatic; despite the completeness of their fossil record, there are very few documented instances of disease and injury in this clade.…

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