First core on deck

We made it to our first drill site! Because we are drilling about 1,600 feet (that’s about 500 metres) below the sea floor, it takes a few hours to get the drill string down to the sea floor to begin coring. After that, 31 ft (or 9.6 metre) sections of cores begin coming up every 40 minutes or so. The core is brought on deck, we let it sit for about 4 hours so it...…

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Life onboard our polar expedition

Much has happened in our 8 day transit from New Zealand to Antarctica. We learned about each other’s science and how we will work together in the coming weeks, hearing talks and taking tours. We crossed the Antarctic Circle and the Prime Meridian, and celebrated co-chief scientist Rob McKay’s birthday with a surprise party. Some were seasick through the Southern Ocean waves but we all made it. The Nathaniel B. Palmer escorted us through some...…

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Life onboard our polar expedition

Much has happened in our 8 day transit from New Zealand to Antarctica. We learned about each other’s science and how we will work together in the coming weeks, hearing talks and taking tours. We crossed the Antarctic Circle and the Prime Meridian, and celebrated co-chief scientist Rob McKay’s birthday with a surprise party. Meals have been good, the gym frequented, sleep cherished. And during the transit we settled into life aboard ship. The ship...…

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Previous scientific expeditions in the Ross Sea (from DSP to Expedition 374)

In 2006-2007, the multinational ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) brought together a team of over 200 scientists, drillers, and technicians. They spent a combined six months on the Ross Ice Shelf over two seasons. They drilled 2 holes through several hundred feet of ice and ocean water to reach the marine sediments. These sediments are the memory of past climate. They contain the ice sheet history of the Ross Ice Shelf. Scientists wanted to learn more...…

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Scientist Post: Imogen Browne

Imogen Browne is a Ph.D. student at the University of South Florida studying under Dr. Amelia Shevenell. Both are onboard scientists for Expedition 374, working as a physical properties specialist and sedimentologist respectively. Check out Dr. Shevenell’s blog, “Expedition Antarctica“. We will be resposting content from that blog as the expedition goes on. Follow Dr. Shevenell on Twitter at @ashevenell and Imogen Browne on Twitter at @ImogenMireille. Journeying to the Ross Sea, Antarctica aboard the...…

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Exp 374 Trailer

Watch on YouTube: the Exp 374 Trailer Forty-five years ago, Leg 28 of the Ocean Drilling Program recovered cores from the Ross Sea that changed the way we think about Antarctic ice. Every decade our knowledge has advanced through more Antarctic drilling expeditions, including ANDRILL projects. Now, the International Ocean Discovery Program makes a long-awaited return to the Ross Sea on Expedition 374. Scientists from 13 different nations will look back in time to understand...…

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Once more beneath the Ross Sea

The science that the JOIDES Resolution is setting off to do is built upon decades of work done by many scientists. This began in 1973 when the first drilling ship to explore the world’s sub-seafloor story, the GLOMAR Challenger, sailed to the Ross Sea from Fremantle, Australia, on Leg 28 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. Before we left port, we had a visit from Prof. Peter Barrett, who was one of 12 scientists on...…

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A landscape of ice

« So much water, so much water….” is a famous quote by our former president Mac Mahon (French president from 1873 to 1879). He would have said these words in front of dramatic flooding in the city of Toulouse. If this quote was applied to Antarctica today, I would like to switch it to “So much ice, so much ice….” Antarctica is the biggest freshwater reservoir on the planet, mainly in the form of ice. About98%...…

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Setting out on expedition 374 to the Ross Sea!

Hi everyone, my name’s Rosa Hughes-Currie and I’m a science teacher in Auckland, New Zealand. I’m aboard the JOIDES Resolution to learn more about the science aboard the ship, tell you about it, and to live my dream of sailing into Antarctic waters! Our departure from Christchurch was exciting for everyone, but especially for me as we’re leaving from my home town. Lyttleton harbour is a giant ancient volcanic crater, which is a great start...…

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Man and the sea

Photgraphy by Justin P. Dodd Free man, you’ll love the ocean endlessly! It is your mirror, you observe your soul In how its billows endlessly unroll Your spirit’s bitter depths are there to see. You plunge in joy to your reflection’s core, With eyes and heart seizing it all along; Your heart sometimes neglects its proper song Distracted by the ocean’s savage roar. The two of you are subtle, shadowy: Man, none has sounded your...…

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