Math-based street art at Art Rapture in Vancouver, Canada; a mathematics lecture in Toronto; and Science Literacy Week in Canada

This is another one of my roundups. The focus is mostly mathematics. Art Rapture 2017 September 22 – 23, 2017 Mark Ollinger claims to be presenting math-influenced street art at Vancouver’s 2017 Art Rapture in a Sept. 12, 2017 article by Joanna Riquett for the Daily Hive, … Tell us about your style, how would you describe it?  My work is very much based in mathematics, I come up with what I would call formulas…

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Yarns that harvest and generate energy

The researchers involved in this work are confident enough about their prospects that they will be  patenting their research into yarns. From an August 25, 2017 news item on Nanowerk, An international research team led by scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in South Korea has developed high-tech yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted. In a study published in the Aug. 25 [2017] issue of the…

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For first time: high-dimensional quantum encryption performed in real world city conditions

Having congratulated China on the world’s first quantum communication network a few weeks ago (August 22, 2017 posting), this quantum encryption story seems timely. From an August 24, 2017 news item on phys.org, For the first time, researchers have sent a quantum-secured message containing more than one bit of information per photon through the air above a city. The demonstration showed that it could one day be practical to use high-capacity, free-space quantum communication to…

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“Innovation and its enemies” and “Science in Wonderland”: a commentary on two books and a few thoughts about fish (2 of 2)

Part 1 featured my commentary on both Calestous Juma’s 2016 book, ”Innovation and Its Enemies; Why People Resist New Technologies” and Meanie Keene’s 2015 book, “Science in Wonderland; The scientific fairy tales of Victorian Britain.” Now for an emerging technology; genetically modified fish (AquAdvantage salmon) and my final comments on the books and the contrasting ways  the adoption of new technologies and science is presented. Fish AquAdvanage salmon features as one of Calestous Juma’s contemporary…

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Vancouver’s (Canada) Fringe Festival (Sept. 7 – 17, 2017) and science

A lot of writers feel the need to comment when art and science are brought together in various artistic/scientific works. Here’s Janet Smith in a Sept. 6, 2017 article about science at Vancouver’s 2017 Fringe Festival for the Georgia Straight, Science and art are often seen as opposites [emphasis mine], but they seem to be intermingling like never before at this year’s Vancouver Fringe Festival. Experimental cancer treatments, zoology lectures, cryogenically frozen heads: they’re just…

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Art in the details: A look at the role of art in science—a Sept. 19, 2017 Café Scientifiqueevent in Vancouver, Canada

The Sept. 19, 2017 Café Scientifique event, “Art in the Details A look at the role of art in science,” in Vancouver seems to be part of a larger neuroscience and the arts program at the University of British Columbia. First, the details about the Sept. 13, 2017 event from the eventful Vancouver webpage, Café Scientifique – Art in the Details: A look at the role of art in science Art in the Details: A…

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Getting a more complete picture of aerosol particles at the nanoscale

What is in the air we breathe? In addition to the gases we learned about in school there are particles, not just the dust particles you can see, but micro- and nanoparticles too and scientists would like to know more about them. An August 23, 2017 news item on Nanowerk features work which may help scientists in their quest, They may be tiny and invisible, says Xiaoji Xu, but the aerosol particles suspended in gases…

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Cyborg bacteria to reduce carbon dioxide

This video is a bit technical but then it is about work being presented to chemists at the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition Aug. 20 -24, 2017, For a more plain language explanation, there’s an August 22, 2017 ACS news release (also on EurekAlert), Photosynthesis provides energy for the vast majority of life on Earth. But chlorophyll, the green pigment that plants use to harvest sunlight, is relatively inefficient.…

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Predicting drug side effects with guts-on-a-chip

It’s been a while since I’ve featured a story about a technology that could drastically reduce (or even eliminate) animal testing. Researchers in the Netherlands have announced some guts-on-a-chip research that may do just that. From an Aug. 22, 2017 news item on ScienceDaily, Research conducted at Leiden has established that guts-on-chips respond in the same way to aspirin as real human organs do. This is a sign that these model organs are good predictors…

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A new wave of physics: electrons flow like liquid in graphene

Unfortunately I couldn’t find a credit for the artist for the graphic (I really like it) which accompanies the news about a new physics and graphene, Courtesy: University of Manchester From an Aug. 22, 2017 news item on phys.org (Note: A link has been removed), A new understanding of the physics of conductive materials has been uncovered by scientists observing the unusual movement of electrons in graphene. Graphene is many times more conductive than copper…

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