Does listening to music or watching television while exercising impact food intake or energy expenditure after the workout?

Today’s post comes from Ms Holly Livock, a recent MSc graduate from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute.  You can find more on Holly at the bottom of this post. Electronic devices are a common phenomenon in today’s society. We use them wherever we go – in our cars, our homes, at work or while we exercise. Television is currently the main sedentary activity in both adult and pediatric populations, with the average…

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Screen Free Summer Reading List

With summer vacation season upon us, I thought it would be a good time for some interesting reading related to topics were cover here at Obesity Panacea.  Here are 3 books that my wife and I have enjoyed recently.  I’ve linked to the book webpages, but I’d encourage you to buy them from a local bookstore if you can. iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy–and Completely Unprepared…

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ParticipACTION releases expert statement on physical activity and brain health in children and youth

Earlier this week ParticipACTION released their annual Report Card on the Physical Activity of Canadian Children and Youth (full disclosure: I’m on the Report Card Research Committee).  The full details can found here.  The Report Card itself is important, but not terribly surprising – Canadian kids still sit too much, and get too little physical activity (sleep is ok, but there’s still a lot of room for improvement there as well). Along with the Report…

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The one question to ask yourself before starting a new exercise program

I see a lot of articles about the most “effective” or “efficient” form of exercise.  These often focus on pretty intense forms of exercise, like high intensity interval training (HIIT).  The focus of these articles are usually either that this type of workout will give you more benefits than your other forms of exercise (“using HIIT in resistance training could be the key to supercharging your strength gains“), or that the exercise will give you…

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Can pedometers measure sedentary time?

For years, I’ve bristled whenever I hear someone say they are using pedometers to see if someone is “sedentary”.  This is because (in my world), we use the term “sedentary” to refer to sitting/reclining/lying down.  Traditionally, pedometers measured steps/day, and nothing else.  So they could tell you if a person was active/inactive, but didn’t tell us anything about how much time a person spent sitting down. However, over the past 10 years pedometers have gotten…

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Phys Ed Teachers Needed for Research Study

A research project at the University of Western Ontario is currently recruiting participants.  To participate or find out more, please contact Stephanie Truelove (519) 661-2111, ext. 88938, email: struelo2@uwo.ca, or Dr. Trish Tucker, (519) 661-2111, ext. 88977, email: ttucker2@uwo.ca. Physical education class provides an ideal environment for students to be physically active; however, the instruction of physical education varies greatly between individual teachers across the country. At this time, physical education specialists (i.e., gym teachers…

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Reallocating time between sleep, sedentary and active behaviours: Associations with obesity and health in Canadian adults

Today’s post comes from Rachel Colley (Senior Research Analyst in the Health Analysis Division at Statistics Canada), and describes a new paper released on April 18, 2018 looking at how time reallocations among sedentary behaviour, sleep, light-intensity movement and exercise are associated with health. The full article is available for free here. A brief summary of the article is also available here. This article has also been posted by the Sedentary Behaviour Research Network. Background…

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Active transportation for the win

I am very passionate about active transportation.  To me, the benefits are obvious.  In the 4 years I’ve been at my current institution, I’ve either run or biked to work most of the time.  I live about 2 miles from campus, so everyday that I bike or run to work, I get about 4 miles of activity.  I do this year-round – mostly biking in the summer and fall, and mostly running in the winter…

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Why are healthcare providers scared of exercise?

Over the past few years I’ve had the pleasure of meeting with a number healthcare providers to discuss the role and importance of exercise for their patients.  In those interactions, I’ve noted 2 common themes pop up on a pretty regular basis. They believe that exercise is important for their patients They are not comfortable prescribing exercise themselves, often because they worry that they may harm their patients It’s not hard to understand why healthcare…

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