Vote for the 2018 Canadian People’s Choice Awards

Exciting news from the folks at the Canadian science blogging network Science Borealis – Obesity Panacea has been named a finalist for their 2018 People’s Choice Awards for Canada’s Favourite Science Blog. If you are so inclined, please feel free to go vote for  any of the deserving blogs at Science Borealis. Thanks to Science Borealis and the Science Writers and Communicators of Canada for promoting Canadian science communication.  

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What I wish I knew before my first Spartan race

Yes, that’s me in the photo above. Pretty damp from a mud bath I was in about 15 minutes before. And mere moments before I tore a healthy hole in my shorts on one of the barbs. Thankfully, I was wearing tights underneath. One of the goals I had for this year was to do something physically challenging. I had been intrigued by obstacle course racing for some time, but was somewhat apprehensive due to…

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How many alcoholic drinks are safe to consume? Zero, apparently.

As most of my friends, family, and colleagues can attest I am essentially a teetotaler. When I was younger and alcohol was forbidden and exotic, I experienced my share of recklessness and fun inevitably followed by illness and headaches. After a few such episodes, I swore to myself that I would never drink that much again. And over the past two decades, I can probably count on two hands the number of times I was…

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Does pop consumption cause obesity? Depends on who funded the research.

Over the years there has been a push to limit the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Various jurisdictions have attempted to levy a tax on these products, including Mexico, Finland, Hungary, France, and parts of the United States. Recently, provincial governments in Canada were kicking the tires on a potential pop tax, including the Northwest Territories and Alberta. Any efforts to throttle mass consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage must be backed by irrefutable evidence that these drinks…

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New meta analysis: short activity breaks reduce the impact of prolonged sitting

Over the past 5-7 years research on the health impact of sitting has absolutely exploded.  When I began my PhD there were only a handful of studies that looked at what sitting does to our metabolic health (blood glucose, insulin, triglycerides, blood pressure, etc).  In a systematic review published in 2012, we found just 5 studies on sitting and metabolic health.  Most of the studies up until that point had focused on really extreme forms…

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Does listening to music or watching television while exercising impact food intake or energy expenditure after the workout?

Today’s post comes from Ms Holly Livock, a recent MSc graduate from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute.  You can find more on Holly at the bottom of this post. Electronic devices are a common phenomenon in today’s society. We use them wherever we go – in our cars, our homes, at work or while we exercise. Television is currently the main sedentary activity in both adult and pediatric populations, with the average…

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Screen Free Summer Reading List

With summer vacation season upon us, I thought it would be a good time for some interesting reading related to topics were cover here at Obesity Panacea.  Here are 3 books that my wife and I have enjoyed recently.  I’ve linked to the book webpages, but I’d encourage you to buy them from a local bookstore if you can. iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy–and Completely Unprepared…

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ParticipACTION releases expert statement on physical activity and brain health in children and youth

Earlier this week ParticipACTION released their annual Report Card on the Physical Activity of Canadian Children and Youth (full disclosure: I’m on the Report Card Research Committee).  The full details can found here.  The Report Card itself is important, but not terribly surprising – Canadian kids still sit too much, and get too little physical activity (sleep is ok, but there’s still a lot of room for improvement there as well). Along with the Report…

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The one question to ask yourself before starting a new exercise program

I see a lot of articles about the most “effective” or “efficient” form of exercise.  These often focus on pretty intense forms of exercise, like high intensity interval training (HIIT).  The focus of these articles are usually either that this type of workout will give you more benefits than your other forms of exercise (“using HIIT in resistance training could be the key to supercharging your strength gains“), or that the exercise will give you…

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