Manitoba UFO sightings are older than the province itself.

Okay - it's Monday. Why not? “The earliest documented encounter came in 1792 from two explorers, David Thompson and Andrew Davy, who were in northern Manitoba where they said they saw several bizarre meteors crash into the ice. Thompson’s diary details how the two were surprised one night by a brilliant “meteor of globular form” that “appeared” larger than the moon.””

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Why beloved polar bear may face bigger risk than previously thought

It's not science by Canadians, but it is certainly science that affects Canadians and science that was done using data from Canadian bears. So, uh, yeah - this might just be a problem folks. “The study found that activity and temperature patterns recorded for polar bears in summer were typical of food-deprived mammals rather than hibernating mammals.”

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Chronic stress and preterm birth linked in surprising way

This is certainly surprising - the experiences need not have occurred anywhere near the time of conception. I'm not sure what "adverse childhood experiences" are however. This is interesting though - I'd like to see what follow-up studies have to say and whether the findings hold up. ““Chronic stress is one of the better predictors of preterm birth,” says Olson, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Medicine &…

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New modeling shows Canadian decarbonization technically possible

Well, strong policies are required, and that is technically possible. But it also claims "innovation" is needed, but I'm not clear what that means and what affect it will have. Is this assuming that currently developed technologies are brought to market? Or does it mean that something that currently doesn't exist needs to be discovered - a "magic wand" if you will? The former seems encouraging. The latter? well, it would invalidate the study. Which one…

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Chicken pox vaccine program ‘clearly working’ among Ontario children

Honestly, I kind of wish the numbers were higher, but even where they are they speak volumes. Vaccines work, and they can reduce both the health hazards (and all the personal toll that they can take) and they reduce the burden on the health care system. Show this to your favorite anti-vaxxer and time how long it takes for them to conclude that Ontario's public health scientists are big-pharma shills. “In a study that looked at…

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Federal scientist muzzled regarding Alberta drought conditions

The story rapidly gets "meta." It starts out as a story about drought conditions and why politicians don't want to use the *word* "drought." Then they note that they tried to talk to a federal scientist about it, but he was not given permission to speak. So - muzzled.But now it gets weird. The story just continues on. In a previous era there would be a hue and cry about the fact that the (taxpayer-funded)…

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Agriculture researchers aim to put sector on election agenda

This is good news. Anything we can do to raise the profile of science in this election - and try to differentiate the parties based on their policies towards it - is a very good thing. ““The burden of reporting has made partnerships more complex than they need to be,” he said. said. Some international researchers, he said, have told him they are so frustrated by the amount of red tape involved they haven’t even…

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NRCan rating employees on conflict of interest risk

I am all for awareness, really I am, but having employees color coded for "risk" is starting to seem a little, I dunno, Orwellian.  “The survey has been greeted with disbelief, concern, and some anger within an already demoralized workforce, says a civil servant within NRCan. “It starts off pretty reasonably, but then gets into personal items, such as having friends at the office.””

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