Special – End-of-Year 2017

  Our second end-of-year special is chock full of bloopers. Plus, the worst bits of medical news this year; favourite jingles; and science communication heroes. Happy holidays! Additional music by Kevin MacLeod (www.incompetech.com) Original music by Seth Donnelly To contribute to The Body of Evidence, go to our Patreon page at: http://www.patreon.com/thebodyofevidence/.  

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Cracked Science: Fooling Investors

  Can successful investors distinguish good science from utter nonsense? If they are not knowledgeable about what bit of quackery has been debunked, they may just fall for it when it is repackaged. You may be puzzled by the metal clips that seemingly give you more strength, but the way to pull off this trick is simpler than you think. My latest Cracked Science segment for the McGill Office for Science and Society.  

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Myth of liberation therapy for MS finally put to rest

If you've been following the story of liberation therapy for MS, we have now come to what is conceivably the end. Eight years after the original W5 segment made this dubious MS treatment widely popular, the scientific evidence is in. Read the full story in the Montreal Gazette here: http://montrealgazette.com/opinion/opinion-myth-of-liberation-therapy-fo... ********************************************************************************************************************************************** Well, it's finally over. It took eight years, but I think we might actually be done. Liberation therapy will hopefully fade into obscurity as…

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035 – Chemotherapy and Stents (and Steven Novella!)

  A Christmas-themed delivery and Stanley-Kubrick-directed opening skit lead Chris and Jonathan to discuss the worth of chemotherapy. Do doctors themselves refuse chemo, and is chemotherapy only effective in 2% of cases? You may be surprised to find out the origin of the latter myth in the Worst Paper Ever (possibly). Also, Jonathan makes Chris cry; will doctors stop stenting stable angina; and Jonathan's interview with Dr. Steven Novella on the importance of the narrative…

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Cracked Science: Arctic Apple

  Arctic Apples are genetically engineered to not brown when you cut into them. Some people are worried that the technology involved in this engineering feat could have negative repercussions on our health, and there's a study that seems to back these fears up. Should we be worried... or is it a case of bad science? My latest video for the McGill Office for Science and Society.  

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Science Borealis Covers The Body of Evidence

"The winner of our 'Canada's Favourite Blog for 2017' contest was Body of Evidence, run by scientists keen on cutting through the prolific medical misinformation found on the Internet. Take a quick look at their site and you'll find many ways to administer your regular dose of medical news-blog post, podcast, or video. Doctor Chris Labos and biological scientist Jonathan Jarry manage this powerhouse site on top of their regular jobs. By day, Chris is a…

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Holiday Heart and Other Health Risks

  As a lead up to the holiday season, I wrote a short piece for the CBC blog about the dangers of alcohol consumption. You can read it here: http://www.cbc.ca/life/wellness/holiday-heart-and-other-drinking-health-... ************************************************************************ Most people these days are well aware of the dangers of drinking and driving, as well as the career ending potential of drunken displays, alcohol can bring with it a number of health hazards that don't make the headlines. While the long-term benefits of…

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Special: The Art of Science

  A conversation with Trevor Butterworth of Sense About Science USA and Adam Oliver Brown of the University of Ottawa on art, science, education, and communication. Topics covered include the use of design in statistics; the silos of academia; false balance in science journalism and recent improvements; how science experts end up in the media; students sneaking into scicomm workshops; apartment design in NYC; the original PhD; Jon Snow, Florence Nightingale and Da Vinci walk…

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Journalists shouldn’t take their audiences down the path of unnecessary medical tests

As some of you might now, I help out with a project called Health News Review that reviews how the media covers medical news. We review news stories and press releases according to see if the news coverage is accurate and free of sometimes exuberant language. This story from a CBS affiliate in Minneapolis is about a new cardiology-testing clinic that put one reporter though a battery of tests. How much of it was necessary?…

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