When the Permafrost Is Gone…

In my upcoming near-future novel “A Diary in the Age of Water”, a Gwich’in colleague of the main character discovers that her entire community, shilakut, perished in a sudden flood in Fort McPherson. They’d been washed away in a flash flood of the Peel River: Most people think that all that meltwater from the melting permafrost creates more surface water, but it causes increased desiccation. The lakes just drain away. But first comes the flood.…

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Rattray Marsh: The gem of Mississauga that almost wasn’t…

The late February day was a sunny 4°C and my soul craved Nature. Knowing that I needed to hear, see and smell water, I headed to one of my favorite places, Port Credit, where the Credit River empties into Lake Ontario. The charming village of Port Credit is also custodian to several parks along the lake. One of them is Rattray Marsh, where I’d never been before. Rattray Marsh is a Credit Valley Conservation (CVC)…

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The Age of Water…

“The story of ascent, the story of separation, and all the institutions built upon them are in a state of crisis–of which the economic crisis is an important part. As the crisis intensified, the core of the dominant culture will have an increasing need for new stories. These, we will discover, are not really new at all, but have been waiting for us in the corners of the world that have escaped, to some degree,…

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The Age of Water…

Una then squatted to my height and looked directly at me with intense green eyes. “Don’t make the mistake of thinking the bully is your friend. He was never your friend. He will never be your friend.” Then she placed her hands gently on my shoulders and added with dreadful calm, “You can play with the bully. But don’t make him your friend. Demand his respect. Or you will become the bully…” Look for Nina…

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Ecosophy: Bringing a World of Growing Scarcity Together

Several decades ago, during the USA President’s Commission on Sustainability, evolution biologist and futurist Elisabet Sahtouris was asked to briefly speak. They had been debating at length on whether the commission needed to include economics when the mandate of the commission was just with environmental issues. The crisis was, Sahtouris realized, unecessarily about arbitrarily—or conveniently—separating what was not separate: of economy vs ecology; of using vs participating; of ‘us’ vs ‘them; of humanity vs Nature.…

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Atwood, Water and The New York Times

“Water Is…” leads Atwood’s Pick for Books of 2016 Every year, near Christmas, The New York Times puts out “The Year in Reading” in which they ask notably avid readers—who also happen to be poets, musicians, diplomats, filmmakers, novelists, actors and artists—to share the books that accompanied them through that year. For the 2016 Year In Reading, The Times asked a prestigious and diverse readership, including Junot Diaz, Paul Simon, Carl Bernstein, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Elizabeth Banks, Samantha Power,…

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Share Your Watermark…And Save the World

Photo by Kevin September Every Canadian has a relationship with water, but each connection to water is unique. A Watermark is a true story about you and a body of water. We all have at least one watermark we can share. We are surrounded by water, after all. We can’t live without it. Water is our heritage, our culture and our precious life-resource. Water is also our responsibility. Sharing our watermarks with others is a…

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What Watershed Do You Live In? And Why Should You Care?

Asked if they knew what a watershed is or why it’s important to know, most people would shake their heads, bemused, and walk away, whispering under their breath: science nerd… That’s what happened when a Toronto Star reporter visited the Richmond Hill area, where one of Toronto area’s main hydrological landmarks is located: the place where the watersheds of Toronto’s three major rivers meet: the Humber River, Rouge River and Don River. No one knew—or…

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Championing Change

I was introduced to one of the wonders of water movement over twenty years ago by accident. While fulfilling my studies for a Master’s of Science degree, I made an interesting discovery. I’d chosen to study periphyton (attached algal) communities in streams affected by organic pollution and urban runoff in a rural community in the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada (where I’m originally from). glass slide holder My study involved placing glass slides in various…

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