Saskatchewan’s First Cold War Uranium Mine

The Nicholson Mine was the first uranium mine to be developed in Saskatchewan. In 1949, it was the only active uranium mine in Canada outside the Northwest Territories. By 1959, the Nicholson ore body had been essentially depleted, but the Nicholson Mine had played its role in helping Canada become one of the largest uranium producers in the world. Learn more about the challenges of developing and operating this mine.

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CMN has been Nominated for Canada’s Favourite Science Blog! Vote for us today!

The Canadian Mountain Network is honoured to announce that we have been shortlisted for People’s Choice Award: Canada’s Favourite Science Blog! from Science Borealis! Voting is open from September 17th to the 29th and the site and blog that receive the most votes will be named the 2018 People’s Choice: Canada’s Favourite Science Online! We are so excited to join the other nominees in this competition and look forward to checking out the other nominees as they…

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Vote in the 2018 People’s Choice Awards: Canada’s Favourite Science Online!

Hello Dear Readers! Science Borealis and their co-sponsor, the Science Writers and Communicators of Canada (SWCC) are excited to present the nominees for the 2018 People’s Choice Awards: Canada’s Favourite Science Online…AND BIRDS IN MUD WAS NOMINATED! THANK YOU! Seriously, thank you! I am honored that people think that what I have to say on studying fossil footprints (a.k.a. ichnology), and life in museums and as a palaeontologist matters. Studying fossils is really all about sharing…

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Sky-high conservation and other unique internship experiences this summer

The Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC’s) summer internship provides an incredible opportunity to experience and learn hands-on about Canada's unique and beautiful landscape. From aerial monitoring to bird banding, our interns are never bored, and they fulfill important conservation roles.

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How To Make Bird Track Casts

Hello, Dear Readers! Part of the research that I do on Cretaceous-age bird tracks (a.k.a. individual footprints) and trackways involves me getting really familiar with all kinds of bird tracks, not just the fossilized ones. Tracks and trackways of small creatures are ephemeral: they do not last very long, and they are easily trampled or eroded away, or they dry and crumble, blowing away on the winds of time. Most of the Cretaceous-age bird tracks…

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