Monday reads

New reads, hot of the press. Very diverse spread of application, news and research.Ten years of barcoding at the African Centre for DNA barcodingThe African Centre for DNA Barcoding (ACDB) was established in 2005 as part of a global initiative to accurately and rapidly survey biodiversity using short DNA sequences. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (CO1) was rapidly adopted as the de facto barcode for animals. Following the evaluation of several candidate loci…

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I’m a #reallifescientist

It’s been a while since my last blog post, and I’m about to deviate even further from my normal routine by sharing a rather personal post. OK, a very personal post.  But as someone who values science advocacy and outreach, I feel this post is nonetheless important to share with both the general public, and young aspiring scientists. I think one of the triggers that has caused me to write this post has been this…

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150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 7 – Current Canadian Palaeos (1) #FossilFriday

Who are some of the current Canadian palaeontologists? A few weeks ago I introduced you to some of the early figures in Canadian palaeontology, but the field has grown substantially, and there are a lot of Canadian palaeontologists, and people working on palaeontology in Canada now. This is going to be the first of a few posts, since there are so many! Starting at 43/150, in no particular order, the first 8 current Canadian palaeos:…

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When the Permafrost Is Gone…

In my upcoming near-future novel “A Diary in the Age of Water”, a Gwich’in colleague of the main character discovers that her entire community, shilakut, perished in a sudden flood in Fort McPherson. They’d been washed away in a flash flood of the Peel River: Most people think that all that meltwater from the melting permafrost creates more surface water, but it causes increased desiccation. The lakes just drain away. But first comes the flood.…

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