Finding strength in numbers

UBC’s Diversity in Mathematics workshops seek to spur an interest in STEM careers. Photo: Istockphoto.Mentorship is a crucial part of STEM retention efforts, especially for women, Indigenous youth and recent immigrants.By Silvia Moreno-GarciaAs an undergraduate student in India, UBC mathematician Malabika Pramanik was one of two women in a cohort of 25. When she moved to North America, she became a visible minority, an immigrant adapting to a new culture. The sense of isolation was…

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People’s Choice Award: Speaking with Stephen Heard, the mind behind Scientist Sees Squirrel

Connie Tang, Chemistry co-editor   Stephen Heard is a professor of environmental ecology at the University of New Brunswick, although you may know him as Steve, the author of the science blog Scientist Sees Squirrel, which is this year’s winner for the Science Borealis and Science Writers and Communicators of Canada (SWCC) People’s Choice Award for […]

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A Slice of Science

By Simon ShapiroWatching "The Great British Baking Show" recently, I was intrigued by the judges' comments. They would glance at piece of bread and immediately say"You proofed it for too long" (or not long enough)"You kneaded it too much" (or not enough)"Overbaked" (or underbaked)"Oven was too hot" (or too cool) "The wrong flour""Too much liquid" They really seemed to know all about the process and what can go wrong. (It sounded complex and lots could…

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#500 500th Episode

This week we turn 500! To celebrate, we're taking the opportunity to go off format, talk about the journey through 500 episodes, and answer questions from our lovely listeners. Join hosts Bethany Brookshire and Rachelle Saunders as we talk through the show's history, how we've grown and changed, and what we love about the Science for the People. Here's to 500 more episodes!

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How UAVs can help industry detect methane gas

Unoccupied Aerial Vehicles (UAVs or drones) are also becoming a tool of interest for upstream oil and gas producers. A methane gas detection UAV is capable of spotting small, isolated gas leaks at ground level from up to 30 meters in the air — a feat that’s not quite as easy as it sounds.

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