Le pétrole, l’ALÉNA et l’automobile (3)

Curieux: depuis l’entente entre les États-Unis et le Mexique, presque tout ce qu’il y avait de reportages sur les négociations pour une nouvelle mouture de l’ALÉNA nous donnait le vendredi 31 août comme date limite, celle décidée par Trump pour pouvoir faire signer l’accord États-Unis/Mexique par le président mexicain Peña Nieto plutôt que par son successeur Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO), plutôt réservé face à l’ensemble. Tout d’un coup, à l’annonce de l’échec des négociations visant…

Continue reading


Scientists can’t take risks until they are in their 40s

When you imagine what goes on in university research centres, you probably don’t think of scientists doing boring predictable things.  Indeed, the romanticized version of academic would suggest that scientists are constantly trying new ideas, pushing the boundaries of what is possible and that out from this process (on a global scale at least) emerges knowledge that explains how the world around us works or translates into useful, practical things for the betterment of society.…

Continue reading


A Frozen World Returns

By Claire EamerThe wolf pup cleaned, preserved, and ready for display.Yukon Government photo.More than 50,000 years ago, when most of Canada was buried under kilometres-thick ice sheets, a wolf pup was born in one of the few places untouched by the ice -- a dry, grassy plain that extended across most of what is now the Yukon. No more than eight weeks later, the little wolf died, probably buried in a landslip and smothered while…

Continue reading


#492 Flint Water Crisis

This week we dig into the Flint water crisis: what happened, how it got so bad, what turned the tide, what's still left to do, and the mix of science, politics, and activism that are still needed to finish pulling Flint out of the crisis. We spend the hour with Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha, a physician, scientist, activist, the founder and director of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, and author of the book "What the Eyes…

Continue reading


Saskatchewan’s First Cold War Uranium Mine

The Nicholson Mine was the first uranium mine to be developed in Saskatchewan. In 1949, it was the only active uranium mine in Canada outside the Northwest Territories. By 1959, the Nicholson ore body had been essentially depleted, but the Nicholson Mine had played its role in helping Canada become one of the largest uranium producers in the world. Learn more about the challenges of developing and operating this mine.

Continue reading