The Undead of Winter

 By Jan ThornhillRuby LOVES to "play dead" so we can will bury her in snow!I love early spring! And no – I’m not talking about tulips and the return of migratory birds, though I have nothing against those things. I’m talking about earlier, in the first weeks of March, when there’s still plenty of snow on the ground, when, for all intents and purposes, it’s still the dead of winter. Except it’s not dead. Minute…

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Friday Fun: We all believed in science at some point…or did we?

The world is going to hell in a hand basket. But at least we can laugh as we’re sucked relentlessly into the Hellmouth. Maybe if we all collectively understood science and evidence better, the path to Hell wouldn’t be quite so straight and narrow. So maybe that’s what’s making me think of these particular funny bits today. And by funny I mean so funny in hurts. First up, we have retired basketball superstar Shaquille O’Neal,…

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150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 7 – Current Canadian Palaeos (1) #FossilFriday

Who are some of the current Canadian palaeontologists? A few weeks ago I introduced you to some of the early figures in Canadian palaeontology, but the field has grown substantially, and there are a lot of Canadian palaeontologists, and people working on palaeontology in Canada now. This is going to be the first of a few posts, since there are so many! Starting at 43/150, in no particular order, the first 8 current Canadian palaeos:…

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#414 Perpetual Now

Most of us probably think about memories as being about the past. But when memories are gone, it becomes clear just how much they are also about the future. This week we are in search of lost memories. We'll speak with Michael McCloskey about how memories are formed and how you test for memory in people with amnesia. We'll also talk with Michael Lemonick about his new book, The Perpetual Now: A Story of Memory,…

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When the Permafrost Is Gone…

In my upcoming near-future novel “A Diary in the Age of Water”, a Gwich’in colleague of the main character discovers that her entire community, shilakut, perished in a sudden flood in Fort McPherson. They’d been washed away in a flash flood of the Peel River: Most people think that all that meltwater from the melting permafrost creates more surface water, but it causes increased desiccation. The lakes just drain away. But first comes the flood.…

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Energy as an enabler: University of Waterloo expert brings affordable, green energy to those who need it most

University of Waterloo sustainable energy expert Jatin Nathwani says the fact more than a billion people have no access to electricity is an injustice. He means to set things right. (Courtesy: University of Waterloo) Every second Thursday, we will be featuring an Ontario Research Chair (ORC) from one of the province’s universities. ORCs are university research professorships, created to drive provincial research and develop excellence, to create world-class centres of research, and to enhance Ontario’s competitiveness…

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