Sommeil léger, protection de la famille

Chronique science du 11 août sur CIBL. Avec l’âge, notre sommeil devient plus léger. Certains s’endorment plus facilement en après-midi pour une sieste bien appréciée. D’autres ont besoin de moins de sommeil la nuit. Selon une étude, ces différences dans le patron de sommeil auraient une cause profonde, enfouie dans notre mémoire évolutive.  Pour démontrer […]

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Analysis of NP-GG differences (I can’t help myself!)

Despite my sensible conclusion to the previous post, I've rushed in with a bit of analysis of the reasons for the differences between the NP and GG uptake-ratio peaks.I was able to do this because the PhD student just posted two new graphs, showing the uptake peaks in syntenic 20 kb segments of the NP and GG genomes. The peaks for the two genomes are in the same places because the underlying DNA sequences are…

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Unexpected differences in uptake of DNA from two closely related strains

The PhD student's long careful reanalysis of the DNA uptake data has finally produced uptake ratio plots.  These confirm a surprising difference between the DNAs from two closely related strains, 86-028NP ('NP') and PittGG ('GG').  We also saw this difference in our preliminary analysis, but we thought it might be an artefact of how the analysis was done.In the experiment underlying this data, cells of a third strain, KW20, took up DNA that had been…

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Right Turn: Small device packs big potential

Whenever something sounds too good to be true, it usually is. The expression is used widely in a variety of contexts, one of which is as a warning to avoid being taken in by a scam or taken advantage of. Unfortunately, it applies to the stem cell field too. I am tempted to state that a new nano device, the Tissue Nanotransfection, developed to heal organs and repair injured tissue, blood vessels and nerve cells…

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Which activity types are healthy alternatives to replace leisure screen time and reduce mortality risk?

Today’s post comes from Dr Katrien Wijndaele, University of Cambridge, UK. More information on Dr Wijndaele can be found at the bottom of this post. Excessive leisure screen time, including TV viewing, is highly prevalent in a large proportion of adults on a daily basis, without signs of decline (3, 6). It is also the type of sedentary behaviour most strongly and consistently associated with the development of chronic disease and premature mortality (4, 8). Reducing…

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031 – Sugar Addiction and Tamiflu

  Chris' addiction almost leads to a car crash, so Jonathan decides to stage an intervention. Is sugar addictive? What even is an addiction? Could it be that the popular definition has little to do with the medical one? Talks of cocaine (or Michael Caine), binge-eating disorder, and How I Met Your Mother follow. Also: did somebody take antiviral Tamiflu's medal away? And why were parents sending their child's snot to researchers? What kind of…

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Low Carb Diets Versus Low Fat

  Between fat and sugar, which is the devil and which is the angel(food)? Chris' latest in the Gazette: http://montrealgazette.com/opinion/opinion-low-carb-diets-versus-low-fat...   Transcript:   Many people, especially TV celebrities with diet books to sell, will tell you that sugar is bad for you and the reason why so many people are overweight. They will then go on to tell you that you can lose weight by switching sugar for fat. The promise is that you can lose…

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Laboratory Beagles Do Well in New Homes

Researchers follow lab beagles as they go to live with a family – and find they adjust very well.Photo: Sigma_S (Shutterstock)Laboratory beagles are used for a variety of experiments. A new study by Dorothea Döring (LMU Munich) et al investigates how they behave in normal life once they are rehomed with a family.As they explain at the start of the paper, “As rehoming practice in Germany shows that appropriate new owners can be found and…

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BRM2017: State of the regenerative medicine industry

Although new to the field of science communication, Nathan Holwell has been involved in a variety of research during his undergraduate career and now in his graduate career. He has done research in drug delivery, gene delivery, biomaterials and diagnostic devices. His graduate research at Queen’s University, where he is pursuing a PhD in Chemical Engineering with a focus in Biomedical Engineering, is focusing on a better way to repair torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs)…

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BRM2017: State of the regenerative medicine industry

Although new to the field of science communication, Nathan Holwell has been involved in a variety of research during his undergraduate career and now in his graduate career. He has done research in drug delivery, gene delivery, biomaterials and diagnostic devices. His graduate research at Queen’s University, where he is pursuing a PhD in Chemical Engineering with a focus in Biomedical Engineering, is focusing on a better way to repair torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs)…

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