Around the Web: A quick list of readings on “predatory” open access journals

As a kind of quick follow up to my long ago post on Some perspective on “predatory” open access journals (presentation version, more or less, here and very short video version here) and in partial response to the recent What I learned from predatory publishers, I thought I would gather a bunch of worthwhile items here today. Want to prepare yourself to counter panic around predatory open access journals? Here’s some great places to start.…

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#425 Cooperative Microbes

This week, we're looking at some of the ways bacteria cooperate with other organisms to break down plants. First we speak with Dr. Lisa Karr, Associate Professor of Animal Science at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and get into the details of how rabbits and cows ferment their food. And Mark Stumpf-Allen, Compost Programs Coordinator for the City of Edmonton, has some practical tips to help you keep your compost pile and soil alive and happy.

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029 – Antidepressants and Fluoride

  Jonathan takes Chris to a secret location for a surprise that doesn't end well, and all because Chris allegedly said antidepressants don't work. To clarify, we delve into the causes of depression, how antidepressants work, as well as the safety and effectiveness of SSRIs. Oh, and suicidal children. Also: is putting fluoride in the water a communist plot and will NSAIDs give you a heart attack?  Special guest voice acting by Jacob Fortin. Jingle…

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Vlog 23: Have We Forgotten What Skepticism Is?

  In light of recent events, self-identified skeptics may need to look back and remember why they call themselves "skeptics" in the first place. What is skepticism? Why do we do it? What are we trying to accomplish? --- TRANSCRIPT: Hey, this is Jonathan from The Body of Evidence. Recent drama I witnessed on YouTube and elsewhere on the Internet has led me to ask myself very basic questions. A community of people may sometimes…

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#424 Biohacking (Rebroadcast)

This week we're talking about do-it-yourself biology, and the community labs that are changing the biotech landscape from the grassroots up. We'll discuss open-source genetics and biohacking spaces with Will Canine of Brooklyn lab Genspace, and Tito Jankowski, co-founder of Silicon Valley's BioCurious. And we'll talk to transdisciplinary artist and educator Heather Dewey-Hagborg about her art projects exploring our relationship with genetics and privacy.

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Progressive Palaeontology 2017

Progressive Palaeontology is a a postgraduate student conference of the Palaeontological Association. This year, the University of Leicester is to host this annual gathering of up and coming palaeontological minds from around the world, bringing together exciting new research that spans the wide breadth of the field. Times of each talk are given below (UTC+1). * denotes a ‘Lightning Talk’. If any problems occur with the stream, please refresh your browser. For persistent problems, please check tweet…

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The Donald Trump War on Science: Pulling out of the Paris Climate Agreement and other recent stories

For people who are wondering why I’m not doing more of my patented chronologies or collections of posts, the answer is pretty simple. There’s so damn much going on it’s hard for me to find the time and mental energy to bring it all together. I’m currently working on posts covering the Trump budget proposal as well as the story about the various issue with the Environmental Protection Agency. I’m not sure when I’ll get…

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Please, enough with the dead butterflies!

We all have pet peeves, even though there’s a lot going on in the world that makes them pretty insignificant. While acknowledging that there are many more important things in life, I write this post about my own personal illustration pet peeve in the hopes that maybe, just maybe, it’ll make a little teeny difference. Here goes: I love butterflies. They’re one of my favorite subjects to illustrate and one of my favorite sights in nature. To…

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A Definition of Covfefe

A clay-based pigment, #covfefe was popular in Russian Neo-Classical paintings depicting decadents in orange drapery. (Anton Losenko, 1763) pic.twitter.com/WNgrw1T2BR— Glendon Mellow (@FlyingTrilobite) May 31, 2017 Even in my jokey shit-tweets, I still credit the artist.— Glendon Mellow (@FlyingTrilobite) May 31, 2017 One more entry into last night's meme-fest on the US President's bizarrely unfinished, long-published typo:"...Covfefe" https://t.co/CR52jO7dba pic.twitter.com/GYNbM6Xg9U— Mellow Covfefe (@FlyingTrilobite) May 31, 2017

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