Interview – Science Moms

  Jonathan and Chris interview three of the Science Moms: Alison Bernstein, Kavin Senapathy, and Natalie Newell. They discuss a bevy of important topics, such as the Dirty Dozen shopping list; the social justice aspect of GE and anti-GE activism; Monsanto; conflicts of interest in research; epigenetic; and, of course, Natalie's film, Science Moms; also, Chris' Spider-Man Theory of What Scares People. The Science Moms documentary can be accessed at ScienceMomsDoc.com, while the moms themselves…

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A whole new world (of wood!)

…or maybe that should be “a whole new wood”! There’s been all sort of fun new stuff happening in the Land of the Muddlers lately, and there’s more to come very soon (but that will have to wait for another post). The big news for today is my new line of laser-cut wood accessories! I’ve been working with the fantastic folks at The Maker Bean here in Toronto to develop these, and boy howdy are…

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Cracked Science: The Genetics of Intelligence

  Is there such a thing as gene for intelligence? And have we found it? Jonathan delves into the world of intelligence genetics where, up until very recently, we knew... well... almost nothing. Also, there's a brick wall involved. It'll make sense. This is episode 15 of Cracked Science, for April 26th, 2018. Jonathan's latest video for the McGill Office for Science and Society.  

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#471 Pigs and Fish: Personality in Animals

This week we learn about how personality is studied in two of our favorite animals: pigs and fish. We'll be speaking with Rose O'Dea, PhD candidate at the Evolution and Ecology Research Centre in Sydney, about using computer animation technology to stimulate behavioral responses in zebrafish. Then we'll speak with Kristina Horback, assistant professor at the University of California-Davis, about the connection between personality traits in domesticated pigs and their ability to cope with stressful…

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What, if Anything, is Sustainability?

Description: Today’s episode is a slightly different format compared to the one we’ve been developing over the last few shows, as we wanted to take advantage of an interesting public conversation that was held at Concordia University a few weeks ago. It was a panel called “What, if anything, is sustainability?” which was a part of the Annual Sustainability Across Disciplines Conference hosted by the Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability. You’ll notice that the…

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#470 Information Spookyhighway

This week we take a closer look at a few of the downsides of the modern internet, and some of the security and privacy challenges that are becoming increasingly troublesome. Rachelle Saunders speaks with cyber security expert James Lyne about how modern hacking differs from the hacks of old, and how an internet without national boards makes it tricky to police online crime across jurisdictions. And Bethany Brookshire speaks with David Garcia, a computer scientist…

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Episode 89: Teeth and herbivory in reptiles

Tooth shape and arrangement is strongly linked with diet, and palaeontologists often use teeth to determine what kind of food an animal may have been eating. Carnivorous teeth are generally more simple, while herbivorous teeth are more complicated. We know that herbivory evolved later, but how did the dentition of herbivores evolve? What kind of variation exists in herbivorous dentition? In this episode, we speak with Dr Aaron LeBlanc, a Killam Postdoctoral Fellow at the…

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The #MeToo Movement in STEM

On Bite Size Science we’ll be discussing an editorial published last month in Science Magazine entitled “Instagram won't solve inequality” and the responses following this article, including that by science.sam (Samantha Yammine). Our main story will examine sexual harassment and assault in the academic science fields. We will hear about the lived experience of Ada, a survivor of sexual harassment (17.40min). We also spoke to Dr. Robin Nelson, a biological anthropologist at Santa Clara University…

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#469 The Death and Life of the Great Lakes

What happens when you take 5 enourmous freshwater lakes isolated in the middle of a continent and suddenly open them up to the Atlantic? The ecology of the North American Great Lakes is changing fast. We spend the hour with Dan Egan, an award-winning writer and reporter at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and a senior water policy fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's School of Freshwater Sciences, to talk about his book "The Death and…

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