It’s Inktober!

Inktober is here! That spooky month where illustrators flit about Twitter with smudgy fingers, eschewing ctrl-z and abstaining from erasable pencils. Ink! Messy, permanent, committed. I've gone deep into my art cabinet and excavated my late grandmother's ink nibs and fountain pens. I think I'll go with a "prehistoric creatures with jack o'lanterns" theme for the month. Find all my sketches here on The Flying Trilobite blog, or on Twitter @FlyingTrilobite. If you want more artists…

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It’s Inktober!

Inktober is here! That spooky month where illustrators flit about Twitter with smudgy fingers, eschewing ctrl-z and abstaining from erasable pencils. Ink! Messy, permanent, committed. I've gone deep into my art cabinet and excavated my late grandmother's ink nibs and fountain pens. I think I'll go with a "prehistoric creatures with jack o'lanterns" theme for the month. Find all my sketches here on The Flying Trilobite blog, or on Twitter @FlyingTrilobite. If you want more artists…

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Episode 81: Coccolithophores

Coccolithophores are tiny unicellular eukaryotic phytoplankton (algae). Each is covered with even smaller calcium carbonate plates called coccoliths and it is these that are commonly preserved in the fossil record. In fact, coccoliths are so small, and can be so common, that they have been able to be employed in areas other than academia. Joining us is Dr Liam Gallagher, Director Network Stratigraphic Limited and a nannoplankton specialist. In this episode, he explains what coccolithophores…

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#441 Superhuman

This week we take a closer look at people with brain abilities that appear superhuman. We speak with Craig Stark, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior at the University of California Irvine, about hyperthymesia and people who possess an extremely detailed autobiographical memory. Then we talk with Jamie Ward, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Sussex, about synaesthesia, multi-sensory substitution, and people who see sounds, taste words, and hear colours.

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International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition

The International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition took place in St. John’s, Newfoundland, in June 2017. The ISECT meeting brought together 150 researchers working on aspects of the stratigraphy, sedimentology, geochemistry and palaeobiology of the Ediacaran and Cambrian Systems. Paleoenvironmental distribution and taphonomic diversity of terminal Ediacaran macrofossils: Insights from the Shibantan Member (China) and the Khatyspyt Formation (Siberia) Xiao, S.*, Pang, K., Bykova, N., Chen, Z., Zhou, C., Yuan, X., Grazhdankin, D.V., and Kaufman,…

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Science in Canada: Save PEARL, The Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory

Deja vu all over again. Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in. Canadian science under the Harper government from 2006 to 2015 was a horrific era of cuts and closures and muzzling and a whole lot of other attack on science. One of the most egregious was the threat to close the PEARL arctic research station. (PEARL website) Fortunately, the outcry was so fierce that the Harper government extended PEARL’s…

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It Begins

When I started my new full time job at Combustion Training earlier this summer, I treated myself to a new Moleskine sketchbook. if there's one thing I've realized, it can be hard for m to create when I'm worried about job hunting and paying the bills.Time to start drawing and sketching daily again! Woke up at 6:30 today and scribbled this out. 

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#440 Weapons of Math Destruction (Rebroadcast)

This week on Science for the People we look at the modern, inventive ways we try to use math and algorithms to make better decisions, and what happens when those solutions cause more problems than they solve. We speak with Cathy O'Neil about her book Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy and the increasingly opaque and unregulated algorithms that are creeping into our lives. We also talk with David…

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