A 50 mm Canadian Canopy coin

Now that it’s summer and the trees are in leaf, it’s fitting that the Royal Canadian Mint has recently released this new 2 oz. silver Canadian Canopy coin that I had the opportunity to design: 2 oz. Pure Silver Coin – Canadian Canopy: The Maple Leaf Of all of the maple canopy coins I’ve worked on, this one—at 50 mm—is the largest. The small openings between the leaves really let the silver “sky” sparkle through.…

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No, Brian Ford, cranial neurovasculature does not mean dinosaurs were aquatic

If you’ve been on twitter these last few months, or follow palaeozoologist Darren Naish on social media, you’ll have surely heard about the new book written by Brian Ford, “Too Big to Walk: The New Science of Dinosaurs”. It’s controversial, to put it politely. Now, apologies to readers who know the back story, but we must set set the scene: Ford isn’t a palaeontologist, for starters, yet somehow he’s managed to wrangle a deal with…

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Weaponized Knowledge

Knowledge mobilization, knowledge translation, and knowledge transfer and exchange – what do these terms really mean? Do you know the difference between innovation and invention? Simon updates Deena on “broader impact” and his take on a recent conference he attended in Winnipeg. As a topic of interest, Simon shares a recent article he came across in the Globe & Mail about Canadian research with an industry partner that led to a patent for the company.…

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#477 Cure for Catastrophe

Tsunamis. Earthquakes. Volcanoes. These are the sorts of natural disasters movies are made from, because throughout history we've learned that natural disasters often become human disasters. But how much are we contributing to the scale of the human toll of natural disasters when they hit? How much do our decisions about where to build, what to build, and how to build impact that cost? We spend the hour with Robert Muir-Wood, author of "The Cure…

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Progressive Palaeontology 2018

Welcome to our coverage of Progressive Palaeontology, the Palaeontological Association’s conference for early-career academics. The conference this year is held jointly between the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University, in a Progressive Palaeontology first! Researchers from both institutions are part of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Ancient Life (ICAL), and their research interests span the entire palaeontological spectrum. Research topics include (but are by no means limited to): the origins and early evolution of arthropods;…

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Speculation and conjecture obscures the true pterosaur menu

Whenever we think about extinct animals we often imagine them tucking into their favourite meals, whether it be a Tyrannosaurus rex munching on a Triceratops steak, or a woolly mammoth enjoying an Ice Age salad. But how often do we ask whether our ideas are grounded within scientific reasoning, or are actually little more than hunger-based conjecture and speculation? Representatively understanding the diets of extinct animals is therefore important for learning how organisms fitted within…

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Special – Science Is a Human Enterprise, Part 1: We’re Not Trained for This

  Chris and Jonathan sit down to demystify how scientific research is conducted and what actually goes on in a lab. They talk about the following: defining terms; Ang Lee's Hulk; laboratory hierarchy; graduate studies; postdocs; salaries; job opportunities; what scientists do with the 61 hours a week they work on average; funding; managerial skills; hiring practices; harassement; rewarding results instead of the process; subpar research; and negative findings. Also, Simpsons references galore. Theme music:…

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