Sketching Tip: Solvent Transfers

Reproducing or presenting an image in an artistic way can help you catch the attention of a wider or different-from-usual audience. One such method is the packing tape sticker I mentioned in my October 2016 newsletter. If you want to create something more permanent, though, you might try solvent transfers. I learned about this printmaking technique … Continue reading Sketching Tip: Solvent Transfers

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Weekend Expedition 73: Mississauga woodlands with Gil

Yesterday I went out to the woodlands near University of Toronto Mississauga with Gil for a springtime walk. We were hoping to see some post-breeding Ambystoma salamanders, and whatever else caught our eye…After a long cold and largely photo-free winter, this outing proved to be rather awesome… The first big spider we saw was this pretty amaurobiid. Their velvety abdomens are quite lovely in soft light. On one of the treetrunks we examined, we saw…

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#416 Bodies Everywhere (Rebroadcast)

This week we're looking at the morbid and fascinating history of our attempts to grapple with disease and death. We're joined by medical historian Richard Barnett to talk about his book "The Sick Rose: Disease and the Art of Medical Illustration." And we'll speak to mortician and blogger Caitlin Doughty about her book "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory", and her ongoing YouTube series "Ask a Mortician", about the history, science…

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My new job: CEO of the United States National Parks Service Library System

You know, I’m the best librarian. Just the best. My collection is huge. The very very best collection. Such a great collection. I love collecting. I’m very good at bibliographic instruction. Nobody does bibliographic instruction like me. Students love it. I can talk for hours. I have long, beautiful book stacks. Look at those book stacks, are they small book stacks? I guarantee you there’s no problem. I guarantee you. And since I’m the best…

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#415 Weapons of Math Destruction

This week on Science for the People we look at the modern, inventive ways we try to use math and algorithms to make better decisions, and what happens when those solutions cause more problems than they solve. We speak with Cathy O'Neil about her book Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy and the increasingly opaque and unregulated algorithms that are creeping into our lives. We also talk with David…

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March 2017 CommNatural Newsletter: Making connections between art & other disciplines

Happy spring, dear readers! The spring equinox was just a few days ago, and my tulips noticed. While they’re not in full bloom yet, they are several inches tall! Although it’s hard to believe it today, as snow falls and the wind rattles the trees outside. My thesis is due at the end of this … Continue reading March 2017 CommNatural Newsletter: Making connections between art & other disciplines

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Books I’d like to read: Ebola, Vaccines, AirBnB, Democracies and more

For your reading and collection development pleasure… It’s been a while since I’ve done one of these posts, kind of seeing what’s on my mind a little in the science-y and tech-y book world and kind of a way to help me remember what I want to pick up. It’s also been a while since I’ve actually reviewed a book, but I do think I’ll be getting to some of the backlog fairly soon in…

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Friday Fun: We all believed in science at some point…or did we?

The world is going to hell in a hand basket. But at least we can laugh as we’re sucked relentlessly into the Hellmouth. Maybe if we all collectively understood science and evidence better, the path to Hell wouldn’t be quite so straight and narrow. So maybe that’s what’s making me think of these particular funny bits today. And by funny I mean so funny in hurts. First up, we have retired basketball superstar Shaquille O’Neal,…

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#414 Perpetual Now

Most of us probably think about memories as being about the past. But when memories are gone, it becomes clear just how much they are also about the future. This week we are in search of lost memories. We'll speak with Michael McCloskey about how memories are formed and how you test for memory in people with amnesia. We'll also talk with Michael Lemonick about his new book, The Perpetual Now: A Story of Memory,…

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