026 – Marijuana and Beach Umbrellas

  Chris learns that he is a square when he can't distinguish between tobacco cigarettes and pot reefers. Thanos interviews some marijuana-friendly comedians before an open-mic night to know if they think weed can help with health and performance anxiety. Back in studio, Jonathan and Chris talk about THC versus CBD, and whether or not weed has been shown to help treat glaucoma, pain, nausea, cancer, multiple sclerosis, insomnia, Tourette's, HIV, anxiety, PTSD, epilepsy, Parkinson's,…

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Set the World on Fire: Chlorine Trifluoride

Anyone who thinks science is boring is either lying or just hasn’t done their research. Not only can science explain the world in a way that no other philosophy can, it can also reveal some truly insane things that seem not to fit in our otherwise mundane experience of the reality. Case in point: Chlorine Trifluoride (CTF), a substance so far outside the realm of crazy that even Nazis  through in the “putting it to…

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#411 Coal Wars (Rebroadcast)

This week we're learning more about the fossil fuel that powered humanity's first industrial age, and helped set us on a course for a looming climate crisis. We'll speak to Richard Martin, energy editor at the MIT Technology Review, about his book "Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet." And we'll explore the environmental impact of coal with Jeff Deyette, assistant director of energy research in the Climate and Energy…

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Friday Fun: The five diseases of academic publishing

My library’s Hackfest was yesterday so I’m feeling kind of burnt out today. Today’s linked post cheers me immensely, in a side-eye, gallows humour kind of way. This recent Retraction Watch post is funny and you should read the whole thing: Got “significosis?” Here are the five diseases of academic publishing. Significosis Neophilia Theorrhea Arigorium Disjunctivitis is a disease that is about a collective proclivity to produce large quantities of redundant, trivial, and incoherent works.…

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#410 The Big Sleep

This week we take a closer look at hibernation and how it works. We speak with Kelly Drew, a neuroscientist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, who studies the Arctic ground squirrel, the "Usain Bolt" of hibernators. And we talk with Frank van Breukelen, a biologist at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who studies an animal who isn't very good at hibernating: the tenrec. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from…

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Jan/Feb 2017 CommNatural Newsletter: Snow sketching, winter vocabulary & more

Happy not-quite-spring, dear readers! Although we’re a long way from actual spring, the weather in my neck of the woods has been decidedly warm lately. That means, I’ve been spending a lot of time outside, roving the prairie with my pup, and, to be honest, writing more than drawing. Even so, the January/February 2017 newsletter … Continue reading Jan/Feb 2017 CommNatural Newsletter: Snow sketching, winter vocabulary & more

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Documenting the Trump War on Science: The Muslim and refugee ban is a terrible idea

US president Donald Trump’s Executive Order 13769, Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States, is a terrible idea for many different reasons and has been widely condemned. Banning people due to their refugee status, religion or national origin has no place in a civilized society. while it has been overturned in court, it appears that Trump is going to try again with a new Order. The purpose of this post isn’t…

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