Alan Copperman and Amanda Marcotte have a very US-centric discussion about CRISPR and germline editing (designer babies?)

For anyone who needs more information, I ran a three part series on CRISPR germline editing on August 15, 2017: Part 1 opens the series with a basic description of CRISPR and the germline research that occasioned the series along with some of the ethical issues and patent disputes that are arising from this new technology. CRISPR and editing the germline in the US (part 1 of 3): In the beginning Part 2 covers three…

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Another System Troubled by Age—Even Healthy Older Adults Can’t Handle the Heat

A new study published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism by researchers from the Universities of Ottawa, Calgary, Sherbrooke, and Thessaly in Greece. Lead author Ryan McGinn explains how older adults are at higher risk for heat stress.  By Ryan McGinn, MSc, MD (Candidate) Increasing age is associated with a host of changes to health and physical function. While it has been thought for some time that older adults also have a reduced ability to regulate…

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CRISPR corn to come to market in 2020

It seems most of the recent excitement around CRISPR/CAS9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) has focused on germline editing, specifically human embryos. Most people don’t realize that the first ‘CRISPR’ product is slated to enter the US market in 2020. A June 14, 2017 American Chemical Society news release (also on EurekAlert) provides a preview, The gene-editing technique known as CRISPR/Cas9 made a huge splash in the news when it was initially announced. But…

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How to Create a Professional Website: A Guide for Academics

By Erin Zimmerman, PhD If you’re in the academic job market these days, or plan to be in the future, you’ve probably given some thought to setting up your own website or been told how important it is. The idea is that a customized website gives you a much greater degree of control over how your public persona comes across online compared to the random scattering of sites and social media a Google search by…

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Oops—Greg Gage does it again! With a ‘neuroscience’ talk for TED and launch for the Plant SpikerBox

I’ve written a couple times about Greg Gage and his Backyard Brains,  first, in a March 28, 2012 posting (scroll down about 40% of the way for the mention of the first [?] ‘SpikerBox’) and, most recently, in a June 26, 2013 posting (scroll down about 25% of the way for the mention of a RoboRoach Kickstater project from Backyard Brains) which also featured the launch of a new educational product and a TED [technology…

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Oct. 9, 2017: Canadian Thanksgiving and US National Nanotechnology Day

For those of us north of the 49th parallel, it’s Thanksgiving. To everyone who celebrates this holiday on the 2nd Monday of October: Have a wonderful day! Onto nanotechnology, according to a Sept. 25, 2017 US National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) news release, National Nanotechnology Day is an annual event featuring a series of community-led events and activities on or around October 9th to help raise awareness of nanotechnology, how it is currently used in products…

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Beautiful solar cells based on insect eyes

What a gorgeous image! The compound eye of a fly inspired Stanford researchers to create a compound solar cell consisting of perovskite microcells encapsulated in a hexagon-shaped scaffold. (Image credit: Thomas Shahan/Creative Commons) An August 31, 2017 news item on Nanowerk describes research into solar cells being performed at Stanford University (Note: A link has been removed), Packing tiny solar cells together, like micro-lenses in the compound eye of an insect, could pave the way…

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Fishways, Fragmentation, and Imperiled Great Plains Fishes

Passages built beside dams to allow trout and salmon to continue moving upstream are common mitigation tools but do these structures work for little fishes too? In a new study published in Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences researchers from Kansas State University track the movement of smaller-bodied fishes (<100 mm in length) up and over a dam.  By Casey Pennock From Montana down to Texas and Colorado across to Missouri, rivers in the American Great Plains formed roughly…

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Fishways, Fragmentation, and Imperiled Great Plains Fishes

Passages built beside dams to allow trout and salmon to continue moving upstream are common mitigation tools but do these structures work for little fishes too? In a new study published in Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences researchers from Kansas State University track the movement of smaller-bodied fishes (<100 mm in length) up and over a dam.  By Casey Pennock From Montana down to Texas and Colorado across to Missouri, rivers in the American Great Plains formed roughly…

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Model-type coding

By model, I mean Karlie Kloss whose computer coding camp project was profiled in an August 31, 2017 article by Elizabeth Segran for Fast Company (Note: Links have been removed), It all started on a whim. Four years ago, supermodel Karlie Kloss decided to take an intensive coding course at New York Flatiron School. She had never written a lick of code in her life, but she wanted to see what the fuss about coding was…

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