Alan Copperman and Amanda Marcotte have a very US-centric discussion about CRISPR and germline editing (designer babies?)

For anyone who needs more information, I ran a three part series on CRISPR germline editing on August 15, 2017: Part 1 opens the series with a basic description of CRISPR and the germline research that occasioned the series along with some of the ethical issues and patent disputes that are arising from this new technology. CRISPR and editing the germline in the US (part 1 of 3): In the beginning Part 2 covers three…

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Uncovering Saskatchewan’s History: Finding and Protecting Artifacts

Archeologists are uncovering hundreds of artifacts in Saskatchewan every year. When there's a risk of development impacting heritage resources, a screening process determines whether or not an impact assessment is required. Find out how a projectile point was discovered at an abandoned mine site.

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CRISPR corn to come to market in 2020

It seems most of the recent excitement around CRISPR/CAS9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) has focused on germline editing, specifically human embryos. Most people don’t realize that the first ‘CRISPR’ product is slated to enter the US market in 2020. A June 14, 2017 American Chemical Society news release (also on EurekAlert) provides a preview, The gene-editing technique known as CRISPR/Cas9 made a huge splash in the news when it was initially announced. But…

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Oops—Greg Gage does it again! With a ‘neuroscience’ talk for TED and launch for the Plant SpikerBox

I’ve written a couple times about Greg Gage and his Backyard Brains,  first, in a March 28, 2012 posting (scroll down about 40% of the way for the mention of the first [?] ‘SpikerBox’) and, most recently, in a June 26, 2013 posting (scroll down about 25% of the way for the mention of a RoboRoach Kickstater project from Backyard Brains) which also featured the launch of a new educational product and a TED [technology…

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Oct. 9, 2017: Canadian Thanksgiving and US National Nanotechnology Day

For those of us north of the 49th parallel, it’s Thanksgiving. To everyone who celebrates this holiday on the 2nd Monday of October: Have a wonderful day! Onto nanotechnology, according to a Sept. 25, 2017 US National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) news release, National Nanotechnology Day is an annual event featuring a series of community-led events and activities on or around October 9th to help raise awareness of nanotechnology, how it is currently used in products…

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Beautiful solar cells based on insect eyes

What a gorgeous image! The compound eye of a fly inspired Stanford researchers to create a compound solar cell consisting of perovskite microcells encapsulated in a hexagon-shaped scaffold. (Image credit: Thomas Shahan/Creative Commons) An August 31, 2017 news item on Nanowerk describes research into solar cells being performed at Stanford University (Note: A link has been removed), Packing tiny solar cells together, like micro-lenses in the compound eye of an insect, could pave the way…

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Model-type coding

By model, I mean Karlie Kloss whose computer coding camp project was profiled in an August 31, 2017 article by Elizabeth Segran for Fast Company (Note: Links have been removed), It all started on a whim. Four years ago, supermodel Karlie Kloss decided to take an intensive coding course at New York Flatiron School. She had never written a lick of code in her life, but she wanted to see what the fuss about coding was…

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A piggyback towards stem cell clinical trials for osteoporosis

Stock imageStem cell researcher Dr. William Stanford knows broken bones. He’s especially familiar with osteoporosis, a disease characterized by bone fragility. In his Ottawa home, Stanford works until the wee hours writing papers and grants that keep his research moving forward. His motivation is simple: finding a cure for osteoporosis.“I have gotten letters from patients who have the most debilitating forms of the disease one can imagine. They’ll list off all the fractures they get…

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