From Our Own Borealis Blog

The longer the path… the shorter the travel time?

By Danielle St. Jean, for the second season of the New Science Communicators Series “On a harsh desert evening, Baal […]

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Right Turn: Eventual relief for those suffering from Crohn’s?

Recently, a friend posted on Facebook the news about her teenage son who, a year ago, had been suffering from an undiagnosed condition. Her son’s doctor didn’t treat the symptoms very seriously until the mother insisted something was wrong and implored him to identify the cause. Finally, her son was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. Along with a diagnosis came options for treatment. One year later, her son is “strong, healthy, happy” and thriving again. My…

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Three Men in a Canoe – A Fossil Legacy

By Larry VerstraeteOver the phone, Don Bell is matter-of-fact and modest, as if just about anyone could have accomplished what he, Henry Isaak, and David Lumgair did. But others didn't - at least not initially, nor to the same degree - and you don't have to look far to find proof of their legacy. It's a floor below the indoor hockey rink in Morden, Manitoba, in a sprawling space called the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre…

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Three Men in a Canoe – A Fossil Legacy

By Larry VerstraeteOver the phone, Don Bell is matter-of-fact and modest, as if just about anyone could have accomplished what he, Henry Isaak, and David Lumgair did. But others didn't - at least not initially, nor to the same degree - and you don't have to look far to find proof of their legacy. It's a floor below the indoor hockey rink in Morden, Manitoba, in a sprawling space called the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre…

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#423 Built On Bones

This week we dig into the world of bioarchaeology to discover what a bunch of dead people's bones can tell us about our past. We spend the hour with Brenna Hassett, bioarchaeologist and author of the new book Built on Bones: 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death", learning about the surprising information stashed away in teeth, bones, and mass graves.

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Thawing Permafrost in Northwestern Canada Associated With Climate Change

Coastal erosion reveals the extent of ice-rich permafrost underlying active layer on the Arctic Coastal Plain in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area of the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska. Credit: Brandt Meixell, USGS In Northwestern Canada, glaciers and permafrost have preserved ancient ground ice and glacial sediments dating back to the late Pleistocene, tens of thousands of years ago. However, recent climate changes have caused temperatures and rainfall to rise, thawing out the permafrost and…

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The man who is breathing new hope into the lives of fragile preterm babies

Dr. Bernard Thébaud’s research using stem cells as a therapy for chronic lung disease in premature infants is advancing thanks to a new grant from the Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine.Dr. Bernard Thébaud. Photo: The Ottawa HospitalExtremely premature babies enter the world with more health challenges than most of us will see in our entire lifetime. Strikingly long, the list of complications includes heart, vision, hearing, gastrointestinal, developmental and respiratory problems, many of which persist throughout…

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Commissioning SciArt Illustrations? Know what you want and what you can spend. (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 6)

This article is the sixth in a series aimed at helping you enhance your #scicommand #sciart by avoiding #visualplagiarism. It will do so by laying out some best practices for dealing with images (which are, by their nature) visual intellectual property protected by copyrights. Please chime in, in the comments or by contacting me, if you have suggestions … Continue reading Commissioning SciArt Illustrations? Know what you want and what you can spend. (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer,…

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