From Our Own Borealis Blog

Cash is on the way out, so what’s in your wallet?

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By Sri Ray-Chauduri, Technology and Engineering Editor With the holiday season just around the corner, merchants are already enticing customers […]

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Canada and Australia release 24-hour movement guidelines for pre-school aged children

Big news today – Canada and Australia just released the world’s first 24-hour movement guidelines for pre-school aged kids.  The Open Access journal BMC Public Health has a full special issue devoted to the guidelines. These guidelines integrate guidelines for physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep.  These were previously covered by separate guidelines (e.g. Canada had one set of PA guidelines, and another set of SB guidelines), which is a bit artificial – imagine if…

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La science, comme la philosophie antique, doit se mettre au service de « la vie bonne »

Francisco Varela, William Irwin Thompson et Evan Thompson. Menerbes, Provence, 1997. Ayant maintenant terminé ma série de billets publiés les mardis sur mes cours à l’Université du troisième âge donnés cet automne, je reprends aujourd’hui mes publications sur divers sujets. Mais je vais dorénavant, pour diverses raisons trop longues à expliquer ici, continuer à les mettre en ligne le mardi (au lieu du traditionnel lundi). Je voudrais donc dire quelques mots cette semaine sur le…

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Could CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) be weaponized?

On the occasion of an American team’s recent publication of research where they edited the germline (embryos), I produced a three-part series about CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), sometimes referred to as CRISPR/Cas9, (links offered at end of this post). Somewhere in my series, there’s a quote about how CRISPR could be used as a ‘weapon of mass destruction’ and it seems this has been a hot topic for the last year or…

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Women in Physics: Dr. Renee Horton

This post is part of an ongoing series by Jenny Kliever about women in physics who have inspired others and contributed to the field in unique and impressive ways. The Canadian Journal of Physics will be publishing a special issue on women in physics in 2018. Keep up to date on all CJP activities by signing up for the CJP newsletter. As a child growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Renee Horton spent many nights…

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That’s a Wrap – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 19, THE END!

Well we’re finally here, only a few months late, at my final post and final 9 bits about Canadian palaeontology. For my last post, I’m going to focus on Saskatchewan and Yukon, two areas I managed to ignore a bit through my previous posts. These are by no means less interesting or important that what I’ve talked about, just slipped my mind and couldn’t figure out where to fit things in. So without further delay,…

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