Science Literacy course for free

 by Paula JohansonThere's so much science being mentioned in the news and social media. But how are we supposed to know the difference between a sensational story and hard facts? A new online course in Science Literacy offered by the University of Alberta is ready to help learners spot sound science—an increasingly relevant skill in today’s world of social media. This course is available at no charge. “The purpose of this course is to teach people…

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Learning About Gardening

 by Margriet RuursThere’s nothing like a pandemic to make people want to be more self-sufficient.First, everyone stocked up on toilet paper and flour. You never knew which shelves would be empty the next time you ventured into a supermarket. It even became difficult to buy new laying hens since, suddenly, everyone wanted chickens. And everyone, it seems, wanted to grow their own food to be on the safe side.Once school was discontinued, my ten year…

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POST NUMBER 500!! Pros and Cons of Studying Elsewhere

Here's our latest post, and it's a real milestone. Welcome to the FIVE HUNDREDTH post on our science writing blog! This one's a trip down memory lane.Pros and Cons of Studying Elsewhereby Raymond Nakamura Ecology is a science in which place makes a big difference to what you study. During the pandemic, travel is not advised, so I thought I'd share some memories of when I went to Japan to study, as a kind of…

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Anatomy for education

 by Paula JohansonHow are children and youths to learn about bodies for health and sex education? This topic is a matter of careful thought for many parents. And there are resources to help families with learning the science of anatomy for health and sex education.Some of these resources are formal and written about the science of how this knowledge helps people. The United Nations World Health Organization has an e-book on International technical guidance on…

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CRISPR and Kids

 by Yolanda Ridge CRISPR and KIDS When I say my new book is about CRISPR, most people look confused. Going on to explain that CRISPR is a biotechnology used to edit DNA doesn’t help much. Sometimes, people make reference to GMOS—which are not quite the same—but mostly it’s just: The first two chapters of CRISPR: A Powerful Way to Change DNA  aim to clear up this confusion. The first chapter provides an overview on chromosomes,…

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Geocaching – A Fun Way to Enjoy the Outdoors

by Margriet RuursGeocaching - A Fun Way to Enjoy the OutdoorsWhat is geocaching?Geocaching can be called a worldwide treasure hunt where you use a GPS to search for hidden objects. It’s a fun and exciting way to enjoy the great outdoors. Geocaching combines the sport of walking with the excitement of discovering treasure. ‘Geo’ means ‘earth’ and ‘cache’ means ‘hidden’ in French.Nico is 10 years old and an avid geocacher. “Geocaching has taught me all…

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Movable Books

 Movable books -- science at work and playby Gillian O'Reilly The term "movable books" (including lift-the-flap, pull the tab and pop-up books) evokes images of diverting children's books or grand paper constructions of Alice in Wonderland, Harry Potter or Star Wars scenes. The roots of these books, however, lie in astronomy and medicine and their pedigree is centuries old. We can look back nearly 900 years to the first known lift-the-flap manuscript, the Liber Floridus…

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Salty Slug Love

Slippery, slimy, oozy slugs; what’s not to love? Slugs can be small and slugs can be as long as your arm! Slugs can be sausage shaped and brown, or they can have leaves, legs, and lots of rainbow colours! They can live anywhere wet, and lots live under the sea. Salty Samples Sea slugs are a family of boneless animals that contain a particularly fancy looking molluscs called nudibranchs. Usually they’re small enough to fit on your…

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Panel discussion at When Words Collide

 Wow! We just finished a terrific panel discussion at a virtual convention. Several writers from Sci/Why were attending When Words Collide, a literary festival that has gone all-online for this year's event. We held a panel discussion on Sunday August 16 with the title Writing Science Books for Youth.If you've come to our website to learn more about writing, put a comment after this post or another recent post and one of us will be…

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Not Your Grandma’s Scientist

By Claire EamerThe default image of a scientist used to be a white man -- usually with more fly-away white hair than was strictly necessary. Maybe a bit like the dude on the right...Of course, we all know now that the image was never really accurate. After all, Crick and Watson's discovery of the nature of the DNA molecule owed a great deal to the remarkable work of Rosalind Franklin.Our current awareness of the dangers…

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