Announcing the EarthCube Early Career Researcher Travel Grant

I feel like I’ve been making lots of funding announcements, but this blog has a slightly special place on the edge of the ecosphere and the geosphere, so it makes sense to broadcast grants that also cross domains, since it’s always fun to get money for the work you do. EarthCube is offering travel grants of $500 for early career researchers (loosely defined) in the geosciences to attend conferences or workshops where they will be…

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Make a Cool $300 (CAD) in Three Easy Steps The CAP Way

Mary Vetter, the Treasurer of the Canadian Association of Palynologists passed this message on through our mailing list: The Canadian Association of Palynologists Annual Student Research Award was established in 2009 to recognize students’ contributions to palynological research. The award is open to any undergraduate or graduate student who is a member, in good standing, of CAP, regardless of their nationality or country of residence. The intent of the research award is to support student…

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PalEON has got a video

In keeping with the theme of coring pictures I wanted to share PalEON’s new video, produced by the Environmental Change Initiative at the University of Notre Dame.  It does a good job of explaining what PalEON does and what we’re all about.  There’s also a nice sequence, starting at about 2:40s in where you get to see a “frozen finger” corer in action.  We break up dry ice, create a slurry with alcohol and then…

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The advantages of taking a chance with a new journal – OpenQuaternary

Full disclosure: I’m on the editorial board of Open Quaternary and also manage the blog, but I am not an Editor in Chief and have attempted to ensure that my role as an author and my role as an editor did not conflict. Figure 1. Neotoma and R together at last! We (myself, Andria Dawson, Gavin L. Simpson, Eric Grimm, Karthik Ram, Russ Graham and Jack Williams) have a paper in press at a new journal called Open Quaternary.…

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Cross-scale ecology at the Ecological Society of America Meeting in Baltimore!

Our Organized Oral Session has been approved and a date has been assigned.  ESA 2015 is getting closer evry day (abstract deadline is coming up on February 26th!), and with it the centennial celebration of the Ecological Society of America.  We’ve managed to recruit a great group of speakers to talk about ecological research that crosses scales of time, rather than space.  Many of these studies share approaches with what we generally consider to be ‘cross-scale’…

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Building your network using ORCiD and ROpenSci

Our neotoma package is part of the ROpenSci network of packages.  Wrangling data structures and learning some of the tricks we’ve implemented wouldn’t have been possible without help from them throughout the coding process.  Recently Scott Chamberlain posted some code for an R package to interface with ORCiD, the rORCiD package. To digress for a second, the neotoma package started out as rNeotoma, but I ditched the ‘r’ because, well, just because.  I’ve been second guessing…

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Recovering dark data, the other side of uncited papers.

A little while ago, on Dynamic Ecology, a question was posed about how much self-promotion was okay, and what kinds of self promotion were acceptable.  The results were interesting, as was the discussion in the comments.  Two weeks ago I also noticed a post by Jeff Ollerton (at the University of Northampton, HT Terry McGlynn at Small Pond Science) who also weighed in on his blog, presenting a table showing that up to 40% of papers in the Biological Sciences…

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More coring photos please!

I’ve started posting some of the coring pictures we’ve received from paleoecologists up on the OpenQuaternary blog.  In an effort to try to preserve this iconic image, and to trace the academic geneology within paleoecology. I posted this message on the PALEOLIM mailing list: Hello all, I was hoping to find pictures of coring expeditions.  In particular lake coring, but I’m happy with anything you might have handy.  The older the better, but, I’m also…

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Enough Mixers Already.

Figure 1. The Mixer is a ubiquitous feature of academia’s social scene, but they can be complicated for a number of reasons. Photo Credit: Fotokannan, via Wikipedia. You’re at a University, you want people to hang out, what do you do? Mixer! If you’re on a moderately large University campus it’s probably pretty likely that you could hit one or two departmental or institutional mixers a week.  Maybe more if you’re lucky and plugged in…

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How far do you go with coding in a collaborative project?

I’ve been coding in R since I started graduate school, and I’ve been coding in one way or another since I learned how to use Turing in high school.  I’m not an expert by any means, but I am proficient enough to do the kind of work I want to do, to know when I’m stuck and need to ask for help, and to occasionally over-reach and get completely lost in my own code. I’ve…

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