Why I haven’t blogged for a while: medical science and society

I am not sure that anyone has wondered why I haven’t blogged for 2 months. I certainly haven’t had a question about it, but still feel compelled to explain. I have two Earth Science and Society blogs in draft stage: one about our travels through northern Spain (geology, archeology, society, Geoparks, UNESCO WH sites – food for thought and my virtual pen). That was the original reason for the blogging break – my husband and…

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Wrong Question: can fracking be done safely?

Originally posted on EARTH SCIENCE SOCIETY: I published this post in February 2013. I have continued to add material to it, so the most recent bits of info are at the top of the page: scroll down for the original, which hasn’t been changed. February 12, 2015 Dr. David Wheeler (president of Cape Breton University), who headed the Nova Scotia (government-appointed) panel on hydraulic fracturing in 2013-2014, gave an excellent speech to the Maritimes Energy Association. It’s…

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Canadian Earth Science for @PMHarper 11 – Dino Hunt!

The preamble to this review series is here Posted today, February 12, the 206th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth and just in time for tomorrow, another #FossilFriday and another day to watch Dino Hunt! —– Bramble, K., M.E. Burns and P.J. Currie, 2014, Enhancing bonebed mapping with GIS technology using the Danek Bonebed (Upper Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon Formation, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) as a case study. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 51, p. 987–991. Cover of the December…

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Extreme tides and Winter ice

Figure 1. Winter ice on the salt marshes of Minas Basin photographed from Wolfville, Nova Scotia, March 1, 2007. View to the North.  What is an estuary? An estuary is a bay with an open connection to the sea. Rivers flow into an estuary, mixing with sea water, resulting in a brackish water environment. All estuaries that we see today came into existence after the rapid sea level rise that marked the end of the…

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Canadian Earth Science for @PMHarper 10 – a question of Iron

The preamble to this review series is here —– Halverson, G.P., F. Poitrasson, P.E. Hoffman, A. Nédélec, J.-M. Montel and J. Kirby, 2011, Fe-isotope and trace element geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic syn-glacial Rapitan iron formation. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 309, p. 100-112. The MacKenzie Mountain front in Canada’s NW Territories as seen from the river plain near Norman Wells. Image from Google Earth (Panoramio). The fieldwork for this paper was carried out in these…

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Nova Scotia’s own Great Unconformity: my new banner photo for 2015

The Angular Unconformity (U) at Nova Scotia’s Rainy Cove, separating intensely folded and faulted early Carboniferous shales and sandstones of the Horton Group (labeled ‘1’ below the unconformity) and gently inclined, undeformed sandstones and conglomerates of the Wolfville Formation (labeled ‘2’) at Rainy Cove, Nova Scotia. The unconformity in this banner photo is exposed along the eastern shores of Minas Basin (location image at the end of this post). It is one of my favourite places…

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A #tsunami is really a tidal wave, except it isn’t

Katsushika Hokusai, Great Wave off Kanagawa. Image from Wikimedia. Original in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA This week marks the 10-year anniversary of the Great Sumatra earthquake which triggered the devastating Indian Ocean Tsunami that killed a quarter million people. A rare and devastating event in itself, it was followed in March 2011 by an even larger earthquake and ditto tsunami in Japan, now known as the Tohoku event. Two-thirds of the world population live…

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Four Billion Years and Counting: Canada is as old as the Earth and this book tells all

    Just published! 400-pages on Canada’s geologic heritage in both official languages for only $39.95! Order your English language copy here and your French copy here.  —– One day last summer, a 40-ish well-educated woman visited our house. She makes a living in gastronomy, is a good visual artist and an avid ocean sailor. She asked me about my professional background and I told her that I am an earth scientist. She looked puzzled and…

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