Owls, Part 2: Giant Fossil Owls and Stolas

It’s time for the next installment of my OWLS! series of blog posts! This one is going to be a little bit different from my other posts…although, if you’ve read any of my Bigfoot or ghost posts you may not be surprised at the theme of this post. My research takes me down a few interesting rabbit holes. One of these holes introduced me to J. A. S. Collin de Plancy’s Dictionnaire Infernal when I searched…

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Wake Up, Discovery: #ItsOurWorldToo

Hello Dear Readers, It’s been awhile since I’ve posted: there have been Things (TM) with which I have had to deal (and as with most Things they are Not Without Ordeal), but I now find myself with some time to return to sharing what I find interesting and fascinating and just plain cool with you, such as my planned series on All Things Owl. Or so I thought. If you’ve been on Twitter during the…

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Owls, Part 1: Fossil Owls

Hello Dear Readers! Live nest cam season is here (and sadly it is now past: too many major life changes happened that put this blog post on hold)! Nest cams are windows into the wonderful world of a very important time in the lives of our present-day theropods: mate interactions, nesting, brooding, and raising young. Besides being completely fascinating, watching owls (and hawks, and osprey, and albatross) nest and raise young is that we know…

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Eye of the Field-Worker

Happy 2019, Dear Readers! This was not a post that I was expecting to write. Honestly, who really wants to hear the gory details regarding eye surgery. Well, apparently my Twitterverse is as morbidly curious as I am about such details. So…who would want to read a blog post about my laser eye surgery? While not directly “my science,” it is something that I did to improve my ability to do #ichnology #fieldwork. — Dr.…

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Field Work Is Hard Work

Note: I originally had these tweets curated on Storify. One of the most high-profile parts of paleontology is the field work. I would bet my last bag of Earl Grey Special (note: must order more tea) that when one thinks of paleontology, the word conjures images of rocky badlands terrain and a small group of people wearing big hats and vests and bandannas crouched in a sun-beaten rocky quarry, dusting off bones that haven’t seen…

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Selling Fossils: Heritage for the Elite

Another day, another set of dinosaur skeletons going to auction. There are at least three skeletons of charismatic dinosaurs being offered for auction by the company Artcurial: the link to the pdf of the fancy-pants advertisement brochure is here. There are many MANY things wrong with the information in the brochure, which calls into question whether actual paleontologists were involved with this process (as the brochure claims.) The Red Flags of the Brochure. There are…

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It’s OK To Like The Mandarin Duck!

(…But Do It Responsibly!) Hello Dear Readers! The past few months have been exciting from a birding-eye-view, especially for Stanley Park in Vancouver, Burnaby, and Central Park, New York City. What do these two areas have in common for birds? Behold the glamorous Mandarin Duck! Move over New York. Metro Vancouver has its own ‘rock star’ waterfowl on the loose. https://t.co/RnS3b7bcP4 — Global BC (@GlobalBC) November 3, 2018 It’s our ducky day. We’ve got a…

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It’s OK To Like The Mandarin Duck!

(…But Do It Responsibly!) Hello Dear Readers! The past few months have been exciting from a birding-eye-view, especially for Stanley Park in Vancouver, Burnaby, and Central Park, New York City. What do these two areas have in common for birds? Behold the glamorous Mandarin Duck! Move over New York. Metro Vancouver has its own ‘rock star’ waterfowl on the loose. https://t.co/RnS3b7bcP4 — Global BC (@GlobalBC) November 3, 2018 It’s our ducky day. We’ve got a…

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Bird Tracks in the Classroom, Prologue

Hello Dear Readers! I’ll be honest: I’m a little preoccupied with present-day bird tracks. I look for them when I’m on walks. I look for bird tracks when I take my recycling to the depot at the dump (the open pond sewage treatment area is there as well, sometimes attracting shorebirds and always attracting ducks and ravens.) Some opportunities I can anticipate, especially the outside-based ones. Others I stumble across. The Fledgling Idea I had…

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Vote in the 2018 People’s Choice Awards: Canada’s Favourite Science Online!

Hello Dear Readers! Science Borealis and their co-sponsor, the Science Writers and Communicators of Canada (SWCC) are excited to present the nominees for the 2018 People’s Choice Awards: Canada’s Favourite Science Online…AND BIRDS IN MUD WAS NOMINATED! THANK YOU! Seriously, thank you! I am honored that people think that what I have to say on studying fossil footprints (a.k.a. ichnology), and life in museums and as a palaeontologist matters. Studying fossils is really all about sharing…

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