Weeding out invasive plant species once and floral


Jenna Finley, Biology and Life Science co-editor  Invasive plants have been a source of frustration to Canadians for decades. These species pose a threat to our environment by “choking out” native plants and decreasing biodiversity, and are a threat to our economy. The federal government estimates that invasive species cost us about $30 billion annually (research, monitoring, management, […]

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To fingerprint or not to fingerprint? That is the question

Chantal Mustoe, Chemistry co-editor In October 2013, in the case of Regina v. Bornyk, a man was arrested, tried and acquitted of breaking and entering in Surrey, British Columbia. The judge assessed the fingerprint evidence himself and dismissed it due to “unexplained discrepancies” and possible effects of “institutional bias” in fingerprinting and the “subjective certainty” of the […]

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Multidisciplinary collaboration helps researchers solve complex, real-world problems

Harrison Brooks, New Science Communicator Newly minted doctor of virology Arinjay Banerjee has always been a gifted student. However, as happens with many graduate students, the way Banerjee thought about his research was flawed at its core. It wasn’t until 2014, when he came to the University of Saskatchewan that he realized it and changed. […]

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Ramp walking helps diagnose lameness in dogs

Emma Thomson, New Science Communicator Researchers at the University of Saskatchewan’s Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) are taking tips from the field of human medicine and rehabilitation to develop a technique to help detect and diagnose injuries in dogs. Gait analysis, pressure walkways, and angled walking are popular techniques used in human medicine. Their use […]

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