BIOCHEMISTRY CARTOON SERIES: BACTERIAL TOXINS AS THE TROJAN HORSE IN BATTLING PANCREATIC CANCER

Written and illustrated by Chloe Mitchell Researcher: Greg BeilhartzGroup: Melnyk Lab Sometimes, even when the main target for treatment of a disease has been identified and there is a known inhibitor, the target is protected behind some sort of barrier. In this case, how do …

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Biochemistry Cartoon Series: The War on Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Cartoon and research description by Chloe Mitchell Researcher: Chloe Mitchell Group: Deber Lab  As an alternative to conventional antibiotics, the Deber Lab has designed peptide-based drugs to inhibit the defense mechanisms of antibiotic resistant bacteria.  Antibiotic resistance is a global crisis that first appeared in the …

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An Introduction to Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in STEM

written by Alison Mao and Heather Lau of the Biochemistry WIDE committee Due to the collaborative nature of science, having diversity in our groups brings valuable differences in perspective that spark innovation. Our endeavours to solve problems and understand the world benefit greatly from the …

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An Introduction to Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in STEM

written by Alison Mao and Heather Lau of the Biochemistry WIDE committee Due to the collaborative nature of science, having diversity in our groups brings valuable differences in perspective that spark innovation. Our endeavours to solve problems and understand the world benefit greatly from the …

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An Introduction to Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity in Science

written by Alison Mao Image by Andrew Zhai Due to the collaborative nature of science, having diversity in our groups brings valuable differences in perspective that spark innovation. Our endeavours to solve problems and understand the world benefit greatly from the inclusion of people that …

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Killing flies with bacteria and other things I couldn’t possibly explain to my grandfather

written by Dr. Justin Nodwell image by Andrew Zhai My grade 11 math teacher, Mr. Dimass, was a fan of short, elegant proofs. Conversely, he had an aversion for anything that was unnecessarily complicated. To indicate such excesses, he used to say, “it’s like you’re …

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