BIOCHEMISTRY CARTOON SERIES: ORGANELLE PROTEIN IMPORT CAN BE PER“PEX”ING

Written by Nicholas Demers, Illustrated by Chloe Mitchell Researcher: Nicholas Demers Group: Kim Lab Our cells contain compartments, known as organelles, that are full of specific proteins. This allows our cellular compartments to perform their functions, such as energy production, protein sorting, pathogen degradation, and …

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Making Biochem More Accessible: the Virtual Biochemistry Day Outreach Event for High School Students

Written by Kate Jiang On March 24th, 2021, the Department of Biochemistry’s Wellness, Inclusion, Diversity and Equity (WIDE) committee held their virtual Biochemistry Day for high school students across Toronto. Biochemistry Day is an outreach initiative for students from underserved areas to learn more about …

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Equity Leads to More Impactful Science

Image credit: Andy Brunning/Compound Interest Written by: Alison Mao and Mikaela Palandra (Biochemistry WIDE Committee) Considering the benefits of diversity in science, it is essential for institutions to take steps to promote the inclusion of underrepresented groups. Our first article in the Equity, Diversity, and …

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An Introduction to Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in STEM

written by Alison Mao and Heather Lau of the Biochemistry WIDE committee Due to the collaborative nature of science, having diversity in our groups brings valuable differences in perspective that spark innovation. Our endeavours to solve problems and understand the world benefit greatly from the …

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An Introduction to Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity in Science

written by Alison Mao Image by Andrew Zhai Due to the collaborative nature of science, having diversity in our groups brings valuable differences in perspective that spark innovation. Our endeavours to solve problems and understand the world benefit greatly from the inclusion of people that …

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Killing flies with bacteria and other things I couldn’t possibly explain to my grandfather

written by Dr. Justin Nodwell image by Andrew Zhai My grade 11 math teacher, Mr. Dimass, was a fan of short, elegant proofs. Conversely, he had an aversion for anything that was unnecessarily complicated. To indicate such excesses, he used to say, “it’s like you’re …

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