Frosty Reception as PED Arrives in Alberta

Since 1972, pork producers have gathered in Banff, Alberta to discuss their industry from its technology to its economics. This year there was an air of concern surrounding the event after the announcement that PED had been discovered in the province in early January. Genome Alberta has helped fund PED research in the past and to date there is still no approved vaccine for the virus. Our livestock blogger Geoff Geddes was at the annual…

Continue reading


045 – Fitness Trackers and Baby Powder

  Don't mind Chris' newfound psychic powers; do fitness trackers like Fitbits actually work? They monitor our heart beats, they count our steps and calories burnt, but do they do it accurately? And can they help us lose weight? Also: you'll never believe what actually motivates people to exercise; early detection is not as easy as it sounds; does Johnson & Johnson's baby powder cause cancer and should you even use baby powder in the…

Continue reading


Cataloging a year of metamodeling blogging

Last Saturday, with just minutes to spare in the first calendar week of 2019, I shared a linkdex the ten (primarily) non-philosophical posts of 2018. It was focused on mathematical oncology and fitness landscapes. Now, as the second week runs into its final hour, it is time to start into the more philosophical content. Here are 18 posts from 2018 on metamodeling. With a nice number like 18, I feel obliged to divide them into…

Continue reading


Right Turn: Churchill, Marx (Groucho!) and appealing to a scientist’s vanity

It’s a new year and my email inbox is brimming with invitations addressed to “Dr.” Stacey Johnson to be a speaker at a scientific conference, be on a scientific editorial board, submit an article based on my research – you get the idea. So what, you say? You also get these invitations? Congratulations. My point isn’t to brag. I am questioning why these conference organizers and journals are so desperate they will invite anyone without…

Continue reading


Why are palaeontologists so interested in mosasaur teeth?

Mosasaurs have a special place in my heart. I worked on them for my Master’s degree, but I also re-visited them as a PhD student. This post explores how mosasaur teeth became some of the most thoroughly studied among any reptile, and how the findings from the debates surrounding them have inadvertently re-shaped our understanding … Continue reading Why are palaeontologists so interested in mosasaur teeth?

Continue reading


Annual progress report highlights the Centre for Innovation’s impactful research, development, education and training

Annual progress report highlights the Centre for Innovation’s impactful research, development, education and training Transfusion Blood Thursday, January 10, 2019 Dr. Geraldine Walsh #WeDoResearch! Through our Centre for Innovation, our engaged network of scientists, medical experts, partners, and collaborators conduct and disseminate high quality, impactful research for the benefit of Canadian patients and the Canadian healthcare system.    The Centre for Innovation’s goal is to drive innovation to improve the blood system by facilitating the creation, translation, and application of new knowledge to support a safe, effective, and responsive…

Continue reading


I talked about Latin names and naming on the Natural Reality podcast

If you’ve been following Scientist Sees Squirrel for a while, you’ve probably noticed that I have a little bit of a thing for the etymologies of Latin (or “scientific”) names of organisms.  It’s perhaps a bit of a niche interest… but it shouldn’t be; there are fascinating stories behind the names we’ve coined.  So much […]

Continue reading