Teach Write: The Dual Audiences of Children’s Literature

Welcome to Teach Write! This column draws on my 20 years’ experience teaching writing to kids, university students, and adult learners. It includes ideas and exercises that teachers can use in the classroom, and creative writers can use to level up their process. Last time, we discussed the special, double audience that we have to consider when writing a class assignment for a teacher. Hopefully that advice will help all the students that have now…

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The climbing metaphor, or where should we encourage students to send their papers?

This is a guest post by Bastien Castagneyrol.  This is an issue I’ve thought about (as have others), and like Bastien, I don’t quite know what action to take.  I like Bastien’s climbing metaphor.  In a related one, the journey from subscriber-pays paywall to author-pays-open-access crosses a very rugged landscape, with crevasses both obvious and […]

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Notre cerveau n’a pas évolué pour gérer autant de sollicitations électroniques

Pendant l’immense majorité de notre longue histoire évolutive nous avons vécu dans le calme des milieux naturels bercés par le vent, probablement semblables à la savane afraicaine d’aujourd’hui (voir l’image au bas de ce billet). De temps en temps, un craquement de branche inhabituel ou un mouvement dans les herbes au loin attirait notre attention. Avec raison : ce pouvait être soit notre repas du soir qui passait, ou soit une bête pour qui l’on…

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Financial investment spurs genome sciences research in Alberta

Genome sciences and bioinformatics research in the province is getting a huge boost thanks to a $3-million investment and the establishment of BioNet Alberta, a research network featuring the University of Lethbridge, the University of Alberta, the University of Calgary, Genome Alberta, Genome Canada, Genome Alberta and other partners. The network is supported by Genome Canada’s Regional Priorities Partnership Program (RP3) and features a BioNet hub at each university, with the newly established Southern Alberta…

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Owls, Part 3: Giant Fossil Owls and Chickcharney

Hello Dear Readers! We all know that Twitter can be somewhat of a cesspool of ‘splainers, sealions, and a haven for creeps in your DMs. Twitter has also been a great place to connect with (good) people and share (good) information! I re-shared my previous post about Stolas and the Giant Cuban Owl Ornimegalonyx for International Owl Awareness Day. I was officially today years old when I learned about a legend of a giant owl and…

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The inertia of science

Some of the greatest scientific advances have been made by maverick scientists; people who go off on tangents despite widely accepted existing paradigms. A paradigm is essentially an accepted framework that directs research to advance by an accumulation of solutions to problems. According to Thomas Kuhn, normal science operates within this framework. From time to time, a revolution may occur, which shifts the paradigm to create a more or less different framework. In other words,…

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Elements of biological computation & stochastic thermodynamics of life

This week, I was visiting the Santa Fe Institute for a workshop organized by Albert Kao, Jessica Flack, and David Wolpert on “What is biological computation?” (11 – 13 September 2019). It was an ambitious question and I don’t think that we were able to answer it in just three days of discussion, but I think that we all certainly learnt a lot. At least, I know that I learned a lot of new things.…

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