Why NASA monitors Penguin Poop (and Other NASA Stuff You Didn’t Know)

Yes, they really doo-doo. Sorry. Yes, they really do. Back in 1966 NASA launched the Landsat program – a bunch of satellites which orbit the earth recording images at various wavelengths (blue, green, red, infra-red, etc.) The latest satellite – Landsat 8 – scans 11 different wavelengths at a resolution of 30 meters. Since Adélie penguins are mostly a lot smaller than 30 meters across, they can’t be seen individually. But where there's a will,…

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Discounting

I am very good at finding the bad aspects of any given idea or thing. I wouldn’t call myself cynical. Rather, I have a tendency to find ways to justify not doing something. This has to do with my reluctance to try new things, and I suspect I’m not the only one who does this. Imagine the following scenario. You’re presented with an amazing opportunity, but there is something you have to do. Maybe you…

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Launching an Upper Year Undergraduate Science Communication Course

I think that in typical Biology undergraduate programs a fair bit of thought goes into giving our students opportunities to improve their communication skills as scientists, but in my opinion this is usually limited to communicating with other biologists. Some time is perhaps spent talking about communicating with scientists outside of our field of study or discipline, but I think that we are really falling behind when it comes to teaching the skills of how…

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Tagging along on the Great Trail

One of the reasons Amanda, Sarah, and I started this blog five years ago (!) is because we wanted to use stories to share some of the amazing places field biologists get to work – places that often aren’t accessible to everyone.  And over the years, we’ve highlighted a lot of stories from these places, from Sable Island to Line P in the Pacific Ocean to an uninhabited islet in Cape Verde. But you don’t…

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On being a gay mathematician redux

Looking back I published the blog post On being a gay mathematician in June 2017. Two years later, I’ve had a generally positive reaction to the post, and I amplified my queer positive message out to the world through my writing and advocacy. I’ve been on a few diversity-type panels and interacted, either in person… Read More On being a gay mathematician redux

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Gastronomie, technologie et diabète: le chef Jérôme Ferrer et Abbott unissent leurs efforts

Mener une vie active et profiter des plaisirs de la table peut constituer un défi pour les personnes atteintes du diabète qui doivent gérer diverses contraintes liées à leur condition de santé. Si l’importance d’une saine alimentation est bien connue, la technologie offre aussi des nouveaux outils qui procurent une plus grande liberté aux personnes diabétiques,

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