Owls, Part 3: Giant Fossil Owls and Chickcharney

Hello Dear Readers! We all know that Twitter can be somewhat of a cesspool of ‘splainers, sealions, and a haven for creeps in your DMs. Twitter has also been a great place to connect with (good) people and share (good) information! I re-shared my previous post about Stolas and the Giant Cuban Owl Ornimegalonyx for International Owl Awareness Day. I was officially today years old when I learned about a legend of a giant owl and…

Continue reading


The inertia of science

Some of the greatest scientific advances have been made by maverick scientists; people who go off on tangents despite widely accepted existing paradigms. A paradigm is essentially an accepted framework that directs research to advance by an accumulation of solutions to problems. According to Thomas Kuhn, normal science operates within this framework. From time to time, a revolution may occur, which shifts the paradigm to create a more or less different framework. In other words,…

Continue reading


Importance of plant holobiont and attending Rhizosphere 5: A conference highlighting the recent developments in the field of rhizosphere

by Pranav PandeThe fact that the climate is changing rapidly in recent years is very well known. Not only is it affecting humans, but it also impacts plants to a great extent. This in turn leads to a decrease in plant quality and their yield is going down at a scale that if not controlled soon, will cause difficulty when trying to cope with the increase in demand for food in the coming years. Picture taken…

Continue reading


Call for Applications: Inaugural Canadian Mountain Network Research Management Committee

The Canadian Mountain Network (CMN) is seeking nominations for the inaugural Research Management Committee (RMC), who will be helping CMN develop a detailed research agenda and policies. Other responsibilities include reviewing and recommending research projects for funding, as well as monitoring progress of network research projects. Deadline – Tuesday September 17 at 5pmPT Application Option #1 – Nominate Yourself Email asykes@ualberta.ca with your resume or CV (no specified format) and a Microsoft Word document with…

Continue reading


Thawing ice in Canada’s North revealing ancient artifacts central to Indigenous cultural identity

As global temperatures rise, mountain glaciers and ice patches are melting at a rapid pace in Canada’s North. In the Yukon and Northwest Territories, snow accumulates and forms permanent ice patches on the northern sides of some mountains. As alpine ice patches melt, the leftover belongings of the North’s first inhabitants are emerging after hundreds and even thousands of years. Mackenzie Mountains Researchers and local Indigenous groups are racing to save these hunting artifacts before…

Continue reading


The story behind guitarist Rob Baker’s water safety video

The Gord Edgar Downie Pier opened to the public in Kingston in 2018. This unique swimming pier was part of a multi-million dollar restoration project at Breakwater Park spearheaded by the City of Kingston. Lake Ontario Waterkeeper’s parent organization, Swim Drink Fish, worked with The W. Garfield Weston Foundation to secure funds to support the creation of the pier and protect the shoreline. Rob Baker, guitarist with The Tragically Hip and Kingstonian, helped us create…

Continue reading