Trois atlas de vrais cerveaux humains accessibles en ligne

Ayant peu de temps pour écrire cette semaine parce que je donne quatre cours différents en 5 jours, je me contenterai de vous signaler trois atlas du cerveau humain accessibles en ligne. Vous pourrez ainsi suivre votre curiosité pour explorer jusque dans ses moindres racoins l’objet le plus complexe de l’univers connu dont on dispose tous d’un exemplaire entre les deux oreilles. Ce billet risque donc finalement de vous faire passer autant de temps devant…

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Meet Dr. Heidi Gardner: the force behind Science On A Postcard

Farah Qaiser is a graduate student at the University of Toronto, where her research involves whole-genome sequencing of patients with neurological disorders. When not in the lab, Farah dabbles in various science communication, policy and outreach initiatives. You can find Farah live-tweeting Toronto’s many science events at @this_is_farah or speed-reading (yet another) dystopian novel on her commute home. Dr. Gardner is known for her signature “Scientist” pink enamel pin Dr. Heidi Gardner is exploring science blogging practices through a WCMT fellowship In early January,…

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Companion Animal Psychology Book Club February 2019

This month's choice by the book club is a favourite about dogs that "...causes one's dog-loving heart to flutter with astonishment and gratitude..." according to the New York Times.This month the Companion Animal Psychology Book Club is reading the best-selling Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know by Alexandra Horowitz.From the cover,"The answers will surprise and delight you as Alexandra Horowitz, a cognitive scientist, explains how dogs perceive their daily worlds, each other,…

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046 – Concussions and the Canadian Food Guide

  Chris gets surprisingly aggressive (and hairy) during a football match, which leads the boys to discuss concussions. Jacob goes to a hockey game and finds a lot of people who are intimately familiar with mild traumatic brain injuries. How common are they, what's the treatment for them, and should you let someone with a concussion fall asleep? Perhaps more importantly, would you let your kid play football (or hockey)? Also: a new iteration of…

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Right Turn: Are we facing a COGs crisis? A recap of Phacilitate 2019

Welcome reception on the patio, just one of many networking opportunities There is no denying that the joining of Phacilitate Leaders World and World Stem Cell Summit has resulted in a grand buffet of tasty treats to appeal to an assortment of consumers. For the second year, the two conferences have attracted academics, industry, government, bioethicists, regulators and philanthropists to Miami, Florida, for talks, partnering, networking, awards and advocacy. This year’s event was reported to…

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Fellow Creatures: New Post on Millennials and Pet Dogs

I have a new post at my Psychology Today blog Fellow Creatures that looks at some new research on dog ownership amongst millennials.The research shows pet dogs bring routine and stability at this time of emerging adulthood, but there are some challenges, especially when it comes to finding pet-friendly rental housing. Take a look: Millennials' pet dogs: an anchor to an adult world.Photo: Fran_/Pixabay

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America’s Changing Relationship with the Pet Dog

How pet dogs moved from the streets to their owner’s beds.Photo: NotarYES/ShutterstockFrom large numbers of free-ranging dogs in the 70s, fast forward to today where many pet dogs sleep in their owner’s bed, and you can see how much Americans love their dogs.A review of the dog and shelter dog population from the early 1970s to today by Dr. Andrew Rowan (Humane Society of the United States) and Tamara Kartal (Humane Society International) charts some…

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La cognition étendue : externaliser pour mieux penser

En 1998 paraissait un article intitulé « The Extended Mind » qui allait faire grand bruit dans le milieu des sciences cognitives. Leurs auteurs, les philosophes Andy Clark et David Chalmers y posaient la question de la frontière de nos processus cognitifs. Étaient-ils restreints au cerveau, comme on serait prêt à la penser de prime abord ? Où débordaient-ils, pour ainsi dire, jusque dans notre corps et même dans certains artéfacts de notre environnement ?…

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This bar needs more TVs

Given my research interests, I spend a lot of time thinking about the way we integrate (and fail to integrate) physical activity and sedentary behaviour into our lives.  Rarely has this been more obvious than last summer, when I flew through Terminal 3 at Pearson airport in Toronto. I had about 5 hours to kill at the airport, so I took my bags and headed to a bar for a beer. An iPad was stuck front…

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