From Our Own Borealis Blog

Llama drama: Research into the mechanics of llama ovulation reveals a rare tumour

Kylie Hutt, New Science Communicator All it took was one ultrasound image to change all of our plans. I was […]

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Winter on the wet West Coast

When you picture winter, images of dripping mosses, lichens and ferns along with long, diffused yellow light rays dappling a lush vibrant green forest floor, combined with the playful cries of the bald eagle may not be what come to mind. However, out here on the wet West Coast of British Columbia, winter is anything but white at sea level.

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Cellulose and natural nanofibres

Specifically, the researchers are describing these as cellulose nanofibrils. On the left of the image, the seed look mores like an egg waiting to be fried for breakfast but the image on the right is definitely fibrous-looking, Through contact with water, the seed of Neopallasia pectinata from the family of composite plants forms a slimy sheath. The white cellulose fibres anchor it to the seed surface. Courtesy: Kiel University (CAU) A December 18, 2018 news…

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A Dry Saskatoon in 2018: Yearly Weather Summary

Take a look back at Saskatoon’s top weather statistics and events of 2018 using data from SRC's Climate Reference Station. Some might be obvious – who could forget the thick smoke blanketing our city in August or the beautiful frost (freezing fog or rime frost) that set in on Saskatoon in late November – but some might also surprise you.

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Yes, I’m teaching a tropical field course. No, it’s not a vacation.

Images: Howler monkey (Alouatta pigra); Royal Flycatcher (Onychorhynchus mexicanus); Helmeted basilisk (Corytophanes cristatus).  All photos © 2017 S Heard, CC BY 4.0 In March, I’ll be heading to Belize to teach an undergraduate tropical ecology field course (not alone; I have an excellent batch of co-instructors).  I mentioned this to someone last week, and their […]

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