046 – Concussions and the Canadian Food Guide

  Chris gets surprisingly aggressive (and hairy) during a football match, which leads the boys to discuss concussions. Jacob goes to a hockey game and finds a lot of people who are intimately familiar with mild traumatic brain injuries. How common are they, what's the treatment for them, and should you let someone with a concussion fall asleep? Perhaps more importantly, would you let your kid play football (or hockey)? Also: a new iteration of…

Continue reading


#511 Ok you worked out, now what?

Ok, you got out the door and did a workout. Excellent work! Now you're sore. Rats. What do you do? Foam roll? Stretch? Stand butt naked in a tank pumping in liquid nitrogen? Put on specially branded pajamas? The recovery options are endless these days. But which of them work best? Heck, which even work at all? We're talking with Christie Aschwanden about her new book: "Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of…

Continue reading


Bettering “Business as Usual” — Social Entrepreneurship edition

Today’s show is something of a continuation of our last show on the Social economy. Today we tackle the topic of social entrepreneurship. We present a clear definition of the term and talk with Daniela Papi-Thornton, who presents a strong case for "mapping the system."  Check the companion episode on the social economy in our series for bettering “business as usual” here.  Our guests today Daniela Papi-Thornton is a Lecturer at Yale School of Management on…

Continue reading


#510 Gene Drives (Rebroadcast)

This week on Science for the People: who is driving this genetic bus? We'll talk with Kevin Esvelt about gene drives, what they are, where they come from what they can be used for, and why the science on gene drives should be done as openly as possible. Then, we'll speak with Laurie Zoloth about the ethical questions surrounding their use, why people are so afraid, and who should be making the decision to use…

Continue reading


Home Testing for Diabetes Might be Unnecessary For Many

Many people with diabetes check their blood sugar at home. It seems like a good idea. But it costs a lot of money. The machines are usually given away for free but the testing strips can cost $1 each. But here's the rub. It may not actually provide any benefit unless you take insulin or certain types of medications, which most patients don't anymore. You can read the full article at the Montreal Gazette site…

Continue reading