From Our Own Borealis Blog

Three lessons about nature from your old Christmas tree

Dan Kraus, Nature Conservancy of Canada, guest contributor People living in the Northern Hemisphere have brought trees and boughs into […]

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WORKS – Orca Dreams by Ilka Bauer

Ilka Bauer’s latest works are stunning meditations on opposition. Through large, highly detailed drawings of the natural world, she explores the intersections of seemingly disparate concepts: art and science, life and death, miniature and massive. Her latest show, Orca Dreams, is the culmination of these gorgeous explorations. On until January 26 at the Gage Gallery in Victoria, BC, the exhibition invites viewers to explore the subjectivity of the boundary between the Real, the Unfamiliar, and…

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Scientometrics and science typologies

Caption: As of 2013, there were 7.8 million researchers globally, according to UNESCO. This means that 0.1 percent of the people in the world professionally do science. Their work is largely financed by governments, yet public officials are not themselves researchers. To help governments make sense of the scientific community, Russian mathematicians have devised a researcher typology. The authors initially identified three clusters, which they tentatively labeled as “leaders,” “successors,” and “toilers.” Credit: Lion_on_helium/MIPT Press…

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From the inbox: PhD Position at SLU Stockholm

PhD student, development eDNA approaches for fish monitoringRef SLU ua 2019.2.5.1-258Do you want to work in an inspiring environment and contribute to the sustainable use of our oceans, lakes and watercourses? We at the Department of Aquatic resources (SLU Aqua) are passionate about our vision "Viable fish stocks in healthy waters". We´re expanding, searching for employees who want to develop themselves and make a difference together with us. The Department of Aquatic Resources conducts environmental…

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Even in winter the Gord Edgar Downie Pier remains a beacon

Photo by Shane Schofield Six months after its public opening, the Gord Edgar Downie Pier remains a beacon for swimmable, drinkable, fishable water across the Great Lakes. My recent trip to Kingston with Mark Mattson reminded me of this. This pier helps people reimagine their connection to Lake Ontario and is shaping a new generation of water leaders.While the summertime crowds hibernate, the swimming pier's magic remains. The breeze, the view, the pier’s connection to…

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“Legends of the Lost” Stays Lost

Pic: A screenshot of the opening sequence of Legends of the Lost In December 2018, the Travel Channel aired a 4-episode special (ratings were so low that I highly doubt a second season will be ordered, so I’m calling it a ‘special’ for now) titled “Legends of the Lost”. Hosted by actress Megan Fox, each episode examined a different archaeological topic and featured Fox travelling to various sites and institutions to talk to experts about whatever topic she was exploring in that particular…

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The Other Side

Saint Andrews, New Brunswick: August, 2018 Basalt and seaweed at Bar Road, Saint Andrews If you travel in the natural world, you have probably noticed places where the bedrock seems to vary drastically and dramatically over a short distance. Perhaps you have seen a place where rocks of different colours are abutted against one another, or where bedrock textures and lineations change. In some cases, this may represent a variation in the deposition of ancient sediments…

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