This solitary dolphin learned to “speak porpoise” and made new friends

Dolphins are very social creatures. But what happens when they become isolated? Some solitary dolphins seek comfort around navigational buoys and sometimes approach other species like humans. But this one solitary short-beaked common dolphin called Kylie found a way to deal with isolation. This common dolphin hanging out in Scottish waters seems to “speak porpoise,” producing sounds similar to those of harbor porpoises and made some friends along the way. Kylie leaping out of the…

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Chief scientist Dr. Dana Devine takes on directorship at Centre for Blood Research

Chief scientist Dr. Dana Devine takes on directorship at Centre for Blood Research Plasma Stem Cells Transfusion Blood Tuesday, January 19, 2021 Catherine Lewis Canadian Blood Services’ chief scientist has been appointed director of the Centre for Blood Research at the University of British Columbia. This new role deepens Canadian Blood Services’ lasting collaboration with the centre and is part of Dr. Devine’s longstanding pursuit of bringing new discoveries to patients in meaningful ways. “As…

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Une devinette sur la mémoire humaine

La semaine dernière, je rappelais qu’on ne dit jamais assez à quel point notre cerveau est plastique, que l’on peut durant toute notre vie renforcer nos synapses qui forment l’engramme de nos apprentissages. Et que cette conception des choses amène une meilleure attitude devant les difficultés d’apprentissage et les erreurs puisqu’elles deviennent alors autant d’occasions d’améliorer nos conceptions et nos idées sur le monde. Or il y a une petite devinette que j’aime poser lorsque…

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Companion Animal Psychology News January 2021

Dogs and optical illusions, cat communication, and wildlife photos... this month's Companion Animal Psychology News.By Zazie Todd, PhDThis page contains affiliate links which means I may earn a commission on qualifying purchases at no cost to you.My favourites this month“We had this crazy question of: Could you give a dog an illusion, and would they be able to see it?”  A dog’s view of illusion susceptibility by Catherine Offord. “All in all, data clearly show that…

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Dr. Celina Montemayor-Garcia on the potential of genomics to shape the future of transfusion medicine

Dr. Celina Montemayor-Garcia on the potential of genomics to shape the future of transfusion medicine Transfusion Blood Thursday, January 14, 2021 Tricia Abe Dr. Celina Montemayor-Garcia joined Canadian Blood Services in August 2020 as a medical officer. As a researcher and transfusion medicine specialist, her main interest is understanding how genomics and bioinformatics can be used to improve care for transfusion patients. She spoke to us about advances in precision medicine and genomics, and what…

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Making a case for investing in Canada revisited: Prioritizing our strengths

Four years ago, I wrote a blog post about Canadian brain drain, seeking to convince readers (though arguably not very well) that, with the right policies, Canada could be the intellectual beneficiary of increasingly intolerant and anti-science political climates in our two closest allies, the United States and the United Kingdom. At the time, the U.S. had just elected Donald Trump to the Presidency, and the U.K. had voted to leave the European Union behind.…

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Are humpback whales the nicest animals in the world?

Altruism: the belief in or practice of selfless concern for the well-being of others. Compassion: sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others. These two words are usually applied to humans and situations involving us. But one question stands: Could some animals like humpback whales have the ability to feel and express compassion and altruism? Scientists are still hesitant when it comes to using words like “compassion” with animals. Yet, growing evidence…

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Being rich makes you less empathetic (even when it’s just Monopoly money)

Today I’m going to talk about the work of social psychologist Paul Piff, whose research interests revolve around social hierarchies, economic inequality, altruism and co-operation. I learned about Piff while working on a French-language documentary inspired by the book Capital in the 21st Century, by French economist Thomas Piketty. In this documentary, Piff explains an experiment in which people playing the board game Monopoly showed disturbing changes in behaviour when they won repeatedly because the…

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Breaking barriers to effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease

Breaking barriers to effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease Plasma Transfusion Blood Tuesday, January 12, 2021 Dr. Geraldine Walsh IVIg is the wonder drug you’ve probably never heard of – yet. Used to treat many different conditions, intravenous immune globulin (IVIg) is manufactured from the plasma of thousands of patients combined. While it’s not exactly clear how it works, IVIg is known to alter a person’s immune response. As such, it’s often called an “immune modulator”…

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Faire l’effort d’apprendre de ses erreurs

C’est aujourd’hui que les enfants québécois du primaire retournent à l’école depuis le 17 décembre dernier. Ils vont cependant le faire dans des classes qui, malgré le discours rassurant du ministre de l’éducation, sont souvent encore mal ventilées. Et ce, alors même qu’était publié la semaine dernière une lettre ouverte de 363 experts canadiens avec l’appui d’experts internationaux et d’autres professionnels implorant les décideurs de s’attaquer de front à la transmission de la COVID-19 par…

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