Cells we see: Art’s history of helping us see the small picture

Left: Robert Hooke’s illustration of his microscope Right: surfaces of seaweed, rosemary and sage Micrographia, London, 1665 Since Robert Hooke first laid eyes on a micro-organism using his custom-built microscope in the 1660s, artists have deployed their skills in service of helping us to see the small picture. Coining the word “cell” to describe what...

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Right Turn: Mooove over meat. Is cellular agriculture here to stay?

Sushi prototype from CELL AG TECH The race to produce lab grown food marches on. So where are we in 2022? Two years ago, blogger Elisa D’Arcangelo outlined some of the practical issues associated with developing lab grown meat – namely cost, increasing production and taste. She also explained the ethical issues around using a...

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The Canadian regulatory system for cell and gene therapies

Aileen J. Zhou brings over a decade of experience in biotech and medical device regulatory affairs. She is an active member and contributing author of the Regulatory Affairs Professional Society (RAPS) and Alliance for Regenerative Medicine’s Regulatory and CMC working groups. Aileen is currently the Director of Regulatory Affairs at NuraLogix. When she wrote this...

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A foray into the future: Predictions for the year 2050

In part 1 of this feature marking the 10-year anniversary of Signals, we got to know the people behind the posts a little better. Now, we’re looking to the future of regenerative medicine and science with the help of our contributors. In this post, bloggers Lyla El-Fayomi, David Kent and Sara Nolte are joined by CCRM leaders Dr....

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Marking a decade of Signals: Get to know the people behind the posts

To mark Signals’ 10-year anniversary, we caught up with some of our active current bloggers — Lyla El-Fayomi, David Kent and Sara Nolte — to get to know them a little better, talk science communication and, in next week’s follow-up post, predict what a science-enabled utopia of the future might look like. Who is your...

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The science behind the headlines: Turning back the clock on skin cells

Image courtesy of Pixaby It’s been all over the news for the last two weeks. Diljeet Gill and colleagues at the Babraham Institute in England are investigating a novel way to reverse aging of skin, opening the door to creating a new possible cell therapy. Their work largely originates from the Nobel prize-winning work of...

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Rebuilding the Canadian biomanufacturing sector

  Artist’s drawing of how CCRM’s biomanufacturing facility at McMaster Innovation Park could look From the H1N1 pandemic of 2009, Canada recognized it was not ready for a pandemic. “What we were not prepared for was for the pandemic to occur when it did,” said an interviewee at a panel review of Canada’s response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. “So, it caught us off guard in that it occurred when it did, that it started…

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Harnessing the liver’s power to regenerate

This article was authored by Julie Crljen, Coordinator, Communications and Outreach at Medicine by Design, a strategic initiative that harnesses the expertise at the University of Toronto and its affiliated hospitals to undertake transformative research in regenerative medicine and cell therapy, power Toronto’s bioscience sector, and strengthen Canada as a global leader in the field. Julie has several years of experience in communications and marketing in the public and non-profit sectors, with a focus on…

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Right Turn: How stem cells may help people with epilepsy

Is it normal to have a pet disease? Ever since I did a project on epilepsy in grade 4, I’ve had an interest in this disorder that affects one percent of the Canadian population, and worldwide there are anywhere from 50-65 million people living with epilepsy, depending on the source. (Every year, 15,500 Canadians learn they have epilepsy.) I can’t remember why I chose this topic for my assignment, but I remember that it made…

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