Love, and its complexity, in a butterfly’s name

Images: The red admiral butterfly, Vanessa atalanta; © Kristian Peters, CC BY-SA 3.0. Portrait, “Vanessa”, 1868, by John Everett Millais, collection of Sudley House, Liverpool; public domain. Last week I shipped off the final revision of my forthcoming book, The Strangest Tribute: How Scientific Names Celebrate Adventurers, Heroes, and Even a Few Scoundrels.*  You know […]

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Of course you can do significance testing on simulation data!

Warning: wonkish. Also long (but there’s a handy jump). Over the course of a career, you become accustomed to reviewers raising strange objections to your work.  As sample size builds, though, a few strange objections come up repeatedly – and that’s interesting.  Today: the bizarre notion that one shouldn’t do significance testing with simulation data. […]

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Where did our (scientific writing) voices go?

Image: European starling by hedera.baltica via flickr.com; CC BY-SA 2.0 A few weeks ago, I argued that unlike fiction writing, scientific writing largely lacks “voice”.  By “voice”, I mean recognizable attributes of text, such as rhythm, vocabulary, style, and other  that makes a particular author’s text unique and that suggest the author’s attitude or personality.  […]

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