Lockdowns Around the World

No one knows life under lockdown better than people living in Toronto. The city has spent most of the pandemic under strict public health restrictions and has experienced one of the longest consecutive lockdowns in North America. Certain restrictions were placed on businesses, workplaces, and schools once lockdowns were ordered, though outside of Ontario, lockdowns haven’t always looked the same. This leaves us with questions as to why governments have had different responses to controlling…

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COVID-19: Defining a new generation

Not infected does not mean unaffected. Although this is true for people of any age during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is especially true of children. “Generation COVID”, also known as Gen C, is the increasingly popular name that was first used to describe babies born after the initial spread of COVID-19. Now, its popular use has expanded to describe children at critical life transitions during the ongoing global pandemic. This name was generated in an…

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All bets are off: Canada’s venture for vaccines

I thought a phrase like this was a thing of the past. It belonged in a primitive era, where survival of the fittest was the dominant way of life. It belonged in movies like the Hunger Games or Death Race, where the protagonists are thrown into impossible life-or-death situations which felt so fantastical that it could only exist in a work of fiction. Perhaps it was my naïveté, but I believed the very framework of…

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All bets are off: Canada’s venture for vaccines

I thought a phrase like this was a thing of the past. It belonged in a primitive era, where survival of the fittest was the dominant way of life. It belonged in movies like the Hunger Games or Death Race, where the protagonists are thrown into impossible life-or-death situations which felt so fantastical that it could only exist in a work of fiction. Perhaps it was my naïveté, but I believed the very framework of…

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Issue 2, 2021 – Cover

With the steadfast development of vaccines, the light at the end of the tunnel appears to be almost within our grasp. Are we finally moving into a post-pandemic world and what does it look like? The COVID-19 pandemic has undeniably and continues to present us with challenges in various realms. It has been a test of human resilience as we are faced with wave after wave of devastation and what feels like doom. We are…

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Letter from the Editors – Volume 9, Issue 2

“THOSE WHO CANNOT REMEMBER THE PAST ARE CONDEMNED TO REPEAT IT.” – George Santayana The COVID-19 pandemic has shifted the way we interact with the environment. As rules become lax and individuals profit from spreading disinformation, we are in another rising wave of COVID-19 cases. The spread of new variants adds fuel to the fire as it begins to poke holes in our already thin defenses. Will we ever see the end of this pandemic,…

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Letter from the Chair – Volume 9, Issue 2

I am certain that it is very safe to say that we are all looking forward to “A Post-Pandemic World”, and this issue of IMMpress Magazine explores what that future may look like. The phenomenal IMMpress team has put together another thoughtful and ever so timely issue, which provides an in-depth examination of the lessons learned from the current and previous pandemics and gives us a clear-eyed and balanced view of what we can hope…

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Jack Of All Trades: An Alumni Interview with Dr. Jason Fine

Dr. Jason Fine completed his PhD in 2012 in Dr. James R. Carlyle’s laboratory at the Sunnybrook Research Institute. His area of study was on how natural killer cells recognize self versus non-self for appropriate target recognition. Jason shares with us his journey and experiences from his graduate studies to his current role as senior clinical reviewer for Health Canada, where he evaluates the safety and efficacy of non-prescription drugs. Flexibility and being unafraid of…

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Pandemic Bestsellers: The Stand by Stephen King

Captain Trips. It sounds like a name for children’s cereal and not a deadly superbug that kills 99% of humanity. When Stephen King first wrote The Stand in 1978, he probably didn’t think it would be this relevant today. The instigating moment for its entire plot is when an infected security guard manages to escape from a biological testing facility before they were able to “lockdown” their gates, a word we are now all too…

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