Globalink Intern Joins The Team

I am happy to announce that Arpit Varshney will join our lab for the summer as a Mitacs Globalink intern. Arpit will be a visiting research associate from June 6th through to August 31st, and will spend his time developing software to support environment and health monitoring (particularly in the Circumpolar North). Arpit is aContinue reading "Globalink Intern Joins The Team"

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Snakebite? Roll out the nanoparticles

An October 4, 2018 news item on Nanowerk highlights some recent research into treating snakebites (Note: A link has been removed), Venomous snakebites affect 2.5 million people, and annually cause more than 100,000 deaths and leave 400,000 individuals with permanent physical and psychological trauma each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases (“Engineered nanoparticles bind elapid snake venom toxins and inhibit venom-induced dermonecrosis”) have now described a new approach to treating snake bites [sic],…

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Four stages in the relationship of computer science to other fields

This weekend, Oliver Schneider — an old high-school friend — is visiting me in the UK. He is a computer scientist working on human-computer interaction and was recently appointed as an assistant professor at the Department of Management Sciences, University of Waterloo. Back in high-school, Oliver and I would occasionally sneak out of class and head to the University of Saskatchewan to play counter strike in the campus internet cafe. Now, Oliver builds haptic interfaces…

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Real-time tracking of UV (ultraviolet light) exposure for all skin types (light to dark)

It’s nice to find this research after my August 21, 2018 posting where I highlighted (scroll down to ‘Final comments’) the issues around databases and skin cancer data which is usually derived from fair-skinned people while people with darker hues tend not to be included. This is partly due to the fact that fair-skinned people have a higher risk and also partly due to myths about how more melanin in your skin somehow protects you…

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Students! Need help with your memory? Try Sans Forgetica

Sans forgetica is a new, scientifically and aesthetically designed font to help students remember what they read. An October 4, 2018 news article by Mark Wycislik-Wilson for Beta News announces the new font, Researchers from Australia’s RMIT University have created a font which they say could help you to retain more data. Sans Forgetica is the result of work involving typographic design specialists and psychologists, and it has been designed specifically to make it easier…

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Teaching molecular and synthetic biology in grades K-12

This is story actually started in 2018 with an August 1, 2018 Harvard University news release (h/t Aug. 1, 2018 news item on phys.org) by Leslie Brownell announcing molecular and synthetic biology educational kits that been tested in the classroom. (In 2019, a new kit was released but more about that later.) As biologists have probed deeper into the molecular and genetic underpinnings of life, K-12 schools have struggled to provide a curriculum that reflects…

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2019 science camps for kids in Ottawa (Canada) and bee hygiene

Today (May 7, 2019), I’m writing up a Canadian science hodge podge of a post. From a sheep shearing festival in May to summer camps for kids: Ingenium’s Canadian science museums Ingenium, for those who don’t know, is the corporate ‘parent’ for the Canada Science and Technology Museum, the Canada Aviation and Space Museum, and the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum. Confusingly, the ‘parent’ was once called the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation (CSTMC).…

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Cannibalisitic nanostructures

I think this form of ‘cannibalism’ could also be described as a form of ‘self-assembly’. That said, here is an August 31, 2018 news item on ScienceDaily announcing ‘cannibalistic’ materials, Scientists at the [US] Department of Energy’s [DOE] Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL] induced a two-dimensional material to cannibalize itself for atomic “building blocks” from which stable structures formed. The findings, reported in Nature Communications, provide insights that may improve design of 2D materials for…

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Feedback Tools To Support Student Learning

There were 31 students in the classroom when I first taught CIS3750. As a team based, flipped, and community-engaged software design classroom, this number was extremely manageable. There were 6 teams, which meant that I could spend a sufficient amount of time with each team during every classroom and lab session – answering questions aboutContinue reading "Feedback Tools To Support Student Learning"

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