Thawing Permafrost in Northwestern Canada Associated With Climate Change

Coastal erosion reveals the extent of ice-rich permafrost underlying active layer on the Arctic Coastal Plain in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area of the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska. Credit: Brandt Meixell, USGS In Northwestern Canada, glaciers and permafrost have preserved ancient ground ice and glacial sediments dating back to the late Pleistocene, tens of thousands of years ago. However, recent climate changes have caused temperatures and rainfall to rise, thawing out the permafrost and…

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Kim TallBear on a Feminist-Indigenous Approach to Inquiry

Credit: Travel Alberta Kim TallBear describes her own research ethic as based on a commitment to “Standing With,” and “Speaking as Faith.” She “inquires in concert” with the communities in which she works and researches. TallBear is critical of discourses of “giving back” to the communities that a researcher studies because it maintains a binary between the researcher(knowing inquirer) and the researched(“who or what are considered to be the resources or grounds for knowledge production”)…

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Canadian Mountain Network Webinar: Developing a Letter of Intent for a Mountain NCE

    On Monday, April 10, 2017, the Canadian Mountain Network hosted a webinar regarding Developing a Letter of Intent (LOI) for a Mountain NCE The CMN presented revised Mountain NCE research themes and modes of doing research and is looking for input on the development of a LOI that will be submitted to the anticipated Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) competition opening in April 2017 (LOI expected to be due August 2017). Networks of…

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Anthropology Field School Focuses on Community Based Research in the Yukon

Yukon Territory. Photo by Matthew Berry This past spring, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Calgary, Sabrina Peric offered a Yukon-based field school for undergraduates entitled, “The Dynamic North: Climate, Economy and Culture in Anthropological Perspective.” The course lasted from May until June of 2016 and will continue to be offered every two years by the University of Calgary’s Group Study Program and the University of Calgary Department of Anthropology and Archaeology. (325)…

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Mackenzie DataStream: Open Access Platform

Peace River. Photo by Doran Clark, courtesy of Travel Alberta Officially launched in November 2016, Mackenzie DataStream is an open access platform for sharing, visualizing and downloading water data in the Mackenzie River Basin. Mackenzie DataStream, developed by The Gordon Foundation in close collaboration with their northern partner the Government of Northwest Territories,  focuses on promoting knowledge sharing and collaborative decision-making throughout the Basin.  This tool contains data collected by 22 communities, in the Northwest…

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Mountain Researchers Disscuss Mountian Reseach at the Mountain Initiative’s Summit Series

Last week on Thursday March 16, Ualberta Mountain Initiatives at the University of Alberta hosted a panel discussion as part of the Summit Series of public lectures featuring Professor Julie Rak of the Department of English and Film Studies (Ualberta); Dr. Daniel Sims of the Department of History and Indigenous Studies (Ualberta – Augustana); and Dr. Alberto Reyes of the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (Ualberta). Professor Julie Rak started the panel with a…

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Canadian Mountain Network is Now on Science Borealis

Photo by Richard Lynch, Courtesy of Travel Alberta. You can now find Environmental Research Summaries by the Canadian Mountain Network on Science Borealis! Science Borealis is a community of “science bloggers located in Canada – and Canadians located abroad – who share (a) commitment to respect, support and encourage science communication in Canada, and engage passionately and critically with science.” Science Borealis features science themed blogs that have a Canadian connection. Blog categories include Biology…

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What Makes Wildlife in Alpine Habitats Special?

White-tailed Ptarmigan. Photo by Susan and Terry Sly. Habitats in the alpine zone are those habitats that exist at high elevations. They have “rugged, partially vegetated terrain with snowfields and rocky ridges, above the natural tree line,” (1). There is often less variety in plant species at these high elevations than there is at lower elevations. The alpine zone experiences “high winds, prolonged snow cover, steep terrain, extremes of heat and cold, and intense ultraviolet…

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Weather Monitoring Through History – A Visit to Campbell Scientific Canada

Photo Courtesy of Campbell Scientific (Canada) Corp. Blog post by Laura Blazejewski Campbell Scientific Canada opened their doors to community members as a part of the 2016 Mountain Festival in collaboration with the University of Alberta. As soon as we entered the Campbell facility, the sense of pride and community was immediately evident. Technical Sales Consultants walked the group through the history of weather measurements in Campbell’s unique facility museum featuring preserved antique weather sensors. Evolution…

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