From Our Own Borealis Blog

Video Made the SciComm Star

By Raymond Nakamura, Multimedia Co-Editor   “I started this,” says chemist Steve Maguire in the introductory video of his YouTube […]

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Blog Feeds

The vast unread masses (or, tremendously unpopular posts)

So The Lab and Field turned 4 years old recently, and as someone not opposed to a little but of navel gazing, I thought it might be interesting to look at the least popular posts since 2013. This was also sort of prompted by a couple of folks who recently read older posts, and exclaimed (well, I imagine them exclaiming) that they’d missed it, or forgotten about it. One of the things I enjoy about blogging is…

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New principles for AI (artificial intelligence) research along with some history and a plea for a democratic discussion

For almost a month I’ve been meaning to get to this Feb. 1, 2017 essay by Andrew Maynard (director of Risk Innovation Lab at Arizona State University) and Jack Stilgoe (science policy lecturer at University College London [UCL]) on the topic of artificial intelligence and principles (Note: Links have been removed). First, a walk down […]

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Irresistible: Emotions affect choice of breed despite welfare issues

Knowing a breed of dog may have health problems does not stop people from wanting one, because emotions get in the way. A new Danish study by Peter S Sandøe (University of Copenhagen) et al investigates the reasons why people acquire particular small breeds of dog and how attached the owners feel to their pet. The research helps explain why some breeds are popular despite a high incidence of welfare problems. The study looked at people in…

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Friday Fun: The five diseases of academic publishing

My library’s Hackfest was yesterday so I’m feeling kind of burnt out today. Today’s linked post cheers me immensely, in a side-eye, gallows humour kind of way. This recent Retraction Watch post is funny and you should read the whole thing: Got “significosis?” Here are the five diseases of academic publishing. Significosis Neophilia Theorrhea Arigorium Disjunctivitis is a disease that is about a collective proclivity to produce large quantities of redundant, trivial, and incoherent works.…

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150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 3, early palaeontologists #FossilFriday

Now onto week 3 of my 150 things about Canadian palaeontology. So far I’ve introduced you to some general bits about palaeo in Canada, and discussed the Burgess Shale. This week I’m going to talk a bit about the important people in some of the history of Canadian palaeontology. Not all are Canadian, but they are some people who really kicked off the interest in Canada. Starting off with number 15/150: 15. In 1856, the first…

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Strategies for a revolution

This must be a record. It has taken me several months to get around to recording the talk I gave last year at EAGE in Vienna — Strategies for a revolution. Rather a gradiose title, sorry about that, especially over-the-top given that I was preaching to the converted: the workshop on open source. I did, at least, blog aobut the goings on in the workshop itself at the time. I even followed it up with…

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Right Turn: New stem cell product for ALS seeking approval in Canada

This week, BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics issued a news release announcing its intent to seek early regulatory approval to distribute its Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) product to patients in Canada. This news was eagerly received by patient groups in Canada and internationally. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is a progressive neuromuscular disease in which nerve cells die and muscles are paralyzed. It is fatal and current treatments are inadequate. Thanks to the #icebucketchallenge social…

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