• Editorial: Creative credit: media use across the web (image credit: R Nakamura) Editorial: Creative credit: media use across the web (image credit: R Nakamura)
  • Celebrating the March Polar Week with APECS! Profiles from the Arctic – the making of a web documentary Celebrating the March Polar Week with APECS! Profiles from the Arctic – the making of a web documentary
  • Editorial: What’s the buzz (or not) around Canadian science policy? (Photo: pmwebphotos; CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) Editorial: What’s the buzz (or not) around Canadian science policy? (Photo: pmwebphotos; CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
  • Editorial: Trading in Wellness (image credit: fiona paloma; CC BY-NC-SA 2.0). Editorial: Trading in Wellness (image credit: fiona paloma; CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).
  • Celebrating the March Polar Week with APECS! Science and community – connecting the dots (image credit: APECS) Celebrating the March Polar Week with APECS! Science and community – connecting the dots (image credit: APECS)

From the Borealis Blog

Creative credit: media use across the web

by Raymond Nakamura and Lisa Willemse

Multimedia subject editors

Original cartoon by Raymond Nakamura.

When we started thinking about this post, Lisa noted that there’s been a lot of chatter about credit for photographers and artists in blog posts, such as the ongoing discussion about Canadian-based I Fucking Love Science and its inconsistent practice of not acknowledging sources. Not only that, but Getty recently announced that it would make its image library available for free to registered bloggers.

We know this …

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