How to Keep Your Research Out of Fake Journals and Scam Conferences

By Erin Zimmerman, Ph.D. “Scientific literacy must include the ability to recognize publishing fraud.” – Jeffrey Beall, Nature (2012) 489(7415):179 By the time you reach the point in your career when you're deciding which journals your work gets submitted to, you've probably at least heard the risks associated with predatory publishers. But as the scams get ever more convincing, it's important to fully educate yourself. Predatory publishers present themselves as legitimate journals, claiming to provide peer review…

Continue reading


Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, by Mary Ellen Hannibal

In her latest book, Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, Mary Ellen Hannibal picks up where Elizabeth Kolbert left off in The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History. Kolbert's book outlined how scientists came to the conclusion that Earth had experienced five major mass extinction events, with the first just over 400 million years ago. These events have been attributed variously to major shifts in the Earth system such as…

Continue reading


Celebrating Dr. Bruce Dancik’s Service to CSP

As many of you know, in the fall of 2016 our esteemed Executive Editor-in-Chief of 26 years, Dr. Bruce Dancik, retired. You can read the official announcement published in our journals. Dr. Dancik led CSP through a period of immense change, not only in the scholarly publishing world, but also as CSP transitioned from part of the federal government to an independent, not-for-profit publisher. In addition to leading the editorial vision of CSP, Dr. Dancik has also…

Continue reading


Ten Steps for Making the Most of Your Post-Doc Years

By Erin Zimmerman, Ph.D. The years you spend as a post-doctoral fellow can be some of the most important—and most overwhelming—of your career. Not only have expectations of you increased, including  your expertise, your work ethic, and your level of professionalism, you also have only a few short years to transform yourself from a fresh-faced Ph.D. grad into someone ready to juggle the workload and responsibilities of a junior faculty member. With a supervisor who…

Continue reading


Anthropocene Coasts is Now Accepting Submissions

Canadian Science Publishing and East China Normal University, along with Founding Co-Editor Dr. Shu Gao and Co-Editor Professor Ian Townend, are pleased to welcome submissions to Anthropocene Coasts. Anthropocene Coasts is a new international open access journal publishing multidisciplinary research that aims to understand and predict the effects of human activity, including climate change, on coastal regions.  The Anthropocene is the period during which human activities have had a marked environmental impact on the Earth,…

Continue reading


Women in Science: Dawn Bazely

By Sarah Boon, Ph.D. This post in part of an ongoing series by Sarah Boon celebrating Canadian women in science. Read through the archive to learn more about the women shaping science in Canada. Dawn Bazely is a Professor of Biology at York University. It was the first tenure-track position she applied for after her postdoc in 1989, and she’s been there ever since. Her academic career, however, has been defined by positions in both Ontario…

Continue reading


Spotlight on Science North: Nightlife on the Rocks

By Jenny Kliever Picture this: you’re out with friends on a Friday night after a long week at work. You’re having a few cocktails over good conversation, there’s live music, people are playing games, others are dancing. Where might you be? Of all the possible places, a science centre probably doesn’t come to mind, right? Well thanks to Science North’s unique adult outreach events, it should! Science North is a science museum in Sudbury, Ontario.…

Continue reading


Open up! On the Benefits of Open Access Publishing

By Jeff Clements, Ph.D. During my undergraduate degree, I remember all too well the many times when I would search for a journal article that I needed to write a paper, only to be stymied by my institution’s inability to afford a journal or publisher’s suite of journals. Of course, Interlibrary Loans could help me get my hands on those papers eventually, but rarely was it sufficient. As a result, I ended up spending money…

Continue reading


How to Write a Scientific Peer Review: A Guide for the New Reviewer

By Erin Zimmerman At some point in almost every scientist’s early career, he or she is asked to peer review a research paper for a journal. Peer reviews are crucial to maintaining a high standard in research and should not be taken lightly. Ultimately, what you’re doing is making a recommendation to the editor, who may or may not have the expertise required to evaluate the work being done. If you’re lucky, your advisor will…

Continue reading


A primer on sigma factor regulation of gene expression

By Ryan Buensuceso, Ph.D. Genes are the basic element of living things, most of them carrying the information to make proteins from DNA through a process called ‘gene expression’. The basic elements of gene expression are two steps, called transcription and translation. In the transcription phase, machinery called RNA polymerase makes an RNA transcript of the gene. This transcript is then translated into a protein in the second step. A single bacterial cell has thousands…

Continue reading