Meet the Editor: Prof. Ian Townend, <i>Anthropocene Coasts</i>

The Canadian Science Publishing family of journals grew this year with the introduction of Anthropocene Coasts, a new international, interdisciplinary open access journal.  Founding co-editor Prof. Ian Townend (University of Southampton) shared with us how global perspectives of how humans are impacting coastal ecosystems are needed to inform social, economic, and legal processes.  Welcome aboard! What is your favourite feature of coastal regions? Being there. I like the contrasts between the tranquil and the raging…

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Celebrating Peer Review Week 2017

By Colin Guthrie, Ph.D. This week we’ve been celebrating Peer Review Week, a time to salute and discuss the sometimes controversial process that remains an important cornerstone of scientific research. The theme of the week this year is Transparency in Review.  What does the word transparency mean in the context of peer review? Peer review is a process that has traditionally taken place behind the curtain. It’s a process that usually happens anonymously: the reviewer…

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What’s in a Name?

By Jenny Crick In science there are always icons, household names. Some are ubiquitous; most people could quote Einstein’s most famous formula, even if they couldn’t tell you what it actually means. Others are more niche; the name Barbara McClintock, who first recognized that genes could "jump" into new positions within a genome, would be instantly familiar to a geneticist, though maybe not to the world at large. Within each field of science, certain names take…

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Conflict of Pinterest: Is Social Media a Conflict of Interest Source in Academic Peer Review?

By Jeff Clements, Ph.D. In 1665, the concept of scholarly peer review was introduced by Henry Oldenburg, the founding editor of the scientific journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society —a highly regarded journal that continues to publish high-quality science today. In general, the process of peer review involves submitting one’s work to scrutiny by topical experts in a given field of research. Such a process is meant to serve a gatekeeping function, preventing the propagation of…

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Expanding and Digitizing Arctic Museum Collections to Preserve Northern Culture and Advance Climate Science

Published this month in Arctic Science, a special issue on Arctic museum collections highlights how natural history museums are more than "cabinets of curiosities." Arctic collections are biodiversity and cultural repositories that help monitor rapidly changing ecosystems, preserve cultural heritage, and enhance public engagement in science and culture. The special issue entitled "Arctic Museum collections: Documenting and understanding changes in biological and cultural diversity through time and space" brings together multi-national teams of researchers to discuss…

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A Grad Student’s Guide to Applying for Scholarships

By Erin Zimmerman, Ph.D. Attending grad school is expensive and can mean heading into the working world with student debt that follows you around for years afterward. One way to minimize this problem is to apply for as much scholarship support as you can leading up to and while you’re doing your degree. While the most well-known funding opportunities tend to be the larger and more competitive ones, there are also many smaller scholarships and…

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Climate Change Communications in Three Steps

By Dick Bourgeois-Doyle My son Jonathon lives amidst the heavy oil fields of Alberta. When I proudly shared the news that I would attend the Canadian Commission for UNESCO's 2017 Annual General Meeting in Montréal, a gathering focused on climate change, its causes, and its threat to the planet, my son was less than enthusiastic. The goal of the event was to determine the best path forward for the next generation that includes my son and…

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What Are Canadian Children Eating at School (and How Can Eating Habits be Improved)?

By: Claire Tugault-Lafleur, MA, RD and Jennifer Black, PhD, RD Evidence suggests that the majority of Canadian children do not meet national dietary recommendations for vegetables, fruit, or dairy products, and their overall diet quality is poor. Schools can be an important place to foster healthy eating habits since children consume one or more meals at school on weekdays. However, no nationally representative studies have examined what children eat at school or whether foods consumed…

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Marching on After the March for Science

By: Joelle Thorpe, Ph.D., Mitacs Canadian Science Policy Fellow The views expressed herein are those of Dr. Thorpe and are not necessarily shared by any organizations with which she is affiliated. This past Earth Day (April 22), thousands of scientists and science supporters gathered in over 600 cities around the world to stand up for the use of science in policymaking. Inspired by the Women’s March in January, and spurred on by perceived threats to…

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Profiling Peatlands to Safeguard Canada’s Wetlands

By: Natalie Sopinka Peatlands are unique wetland terrains made up of an accumulation of decaying plants; they also cover over 1 million km2 of Canada. Don’t be fooled by these swaths of decomposing vegetation, peatlands provide essential ecological services such as capturing carbon dioxide and also contribute to increasing regional biodiversity. In addition to finding an array of bird species in peatlands, you can also find an abundance of orchids, including rare and endangered species. Peatlands…

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