Into the Heart of SciArt

By Katrina Wong and Raymond Nakamura, Multimedia Co-Editors   Art is the Queen of all sciences communicating knowledge to all the generations of the world – Leonardo da Vinci.   Our multimedia category deals with diverse and unexpected approaches to communicating science. As the love child of science and art, “SciArt” can have an even […]

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The path of totality

 By Kira Hoffman, General Science Co-editor This summer, many North Americans will witness a celestial wonder—a total solar eclipse. The moon will completely cover the sun for two minutes and forty seconds. This rare sight has not been viewed from coast to coast in the United States since 1918. The relatively narrow path of totality […]

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Mind over matter: using meditation and mindfulness to combat stress

Catherine Lau, Biology and Life Sciences Co-editor Take a deep breath, clear your mind and be aware of your breathing. These instructions, while seemingly simple, are often easier said than done. Yet with practice, this mental exercise derived from meditation and mindfulness can improve cognitive function and overall wellbeing. While they are rooted in Buddhist […]

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Introducing the second season of the New Science Communicator series!

Last year, Science Borealis debuted the New Science Communicator series in collaboration with Science Atlantic and Canadian Science Publishing. We ran four outstanding posts by students who had won communication awards at one of the various Science Atlantic conferences in 2015-2016, covering everything from plant conservation to computational physics. All four posts can be found […]

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Old science learns new tricks—applications of new technology in the geosciences

By Tanya Samman, Earth and Environmental Science Co-editor In recent years, many areas of the geosciences, including palaeontology, have adopted cutting edge technology and techniques—sometimes in unexpected ways. There are lots of potential applications! Today I’m describing three examples: mapping fossil sites; obtaining soft tissue information from fossils; and armchair geoscience. The first two illustrate […]

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Hysterical hypotheses

Robert Gooding-Townsend, Science in Society Co-editor   Today, I’m at the airport, heading back from a visit to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston, where I enjoyed a series of scientific talks. Exciting, right? Except, I wasn’t attending a conference, presenting anything or meeting any potential co-authors. In fact, nobody seemed to take me […]

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