#GenderedToys are awful

Okay. I know it has been a REALLY long time since my last post. It’s not because I have been lazy – in the past few months I have spent much of my energy founding Curiosity Collider, a non-profit focus on innovative and interdisciplinary ways to experience science. Plus, at some point my personal life needs to take priority :D Now that things are moving along quite nicely, maybe I will start writing a little more… Anyways, today…

Continue reading


Women in STEM – 2014 in Review

What are the highs and lows for women in STEM this year? The Field Prize: Maryam Mirzakhani became the first female winner for the prestigious Field Medal in mathematics. A bitter sweet moment, to tell the truth, because for whatever reason no other woman has received the prize since its inception in 1936. I couldn’t help but ask why, and wonder how many other outstanding women have been overlooked when it comes to prestigious awards in STEM? More Curies and more…

Continue reading


How to prepare a resume for a non-academic science job?

As you probably know already, my career path hasn’t exactly been a straight line. The transferable skills I developed during graduate school were very critical when I was looking for a job as a science communicator. Recently after a twitter conversation about the importance of transferable skills with Karen Lo (@kareynlo ) and Joanne Kamens (@JKamens), I was invited by Joanne from Addgene to write a guest post about presenting these transferable skills in a resume for a…

Continue reading


Tipping Point of Science Communication in Canada – A Response

I had the opportunity to represent my department at the Vancouver Telus World of Science during Telus World of Science Community Celebration Free Admission Weekend last year. 20,500 people showed up. Not just families, which we normally would expect with a visit to the Science World, but also teenagers, young adults, retirees, and more. People lining up around the block in the rain, waiting to enter the Science World. Having done science outreach and communications…

Continue reading


How space dust teaches us about scientific progresses

Sometimes I feel that it sucks to be a physicist. (Just to clarify – I am not one, and this is my personal opinion, having worked years in a department full of physicists, and with a background in non-physics fields. This is not after any discussion with other physicists in my dept – they might agree, they might not) There was a major announcement back in March that results from BICEP2, a telescope sitting in the South Pole,…

Continue reading


Science, alone, cannot resolve the Ebola crisis

When I first set out to write this article, I was hoping to write about the science – the science behind potential treatments, research going from bench to bedside, the importance of clinical trials. But, this is not what this post will be about. At the time this article is written, Ebola is raging through West Africa. So far, 4872 cases have been reported, and 2445 have died because of Ebola. Ebola epidemic is the largest, and most severe, and…

Continue reading


Introducing “The Lab” – a YouTube comedy series about grad students working in a science lab

What can four busy graduates from the Banff Science Communications Program come up with during a random night of dinner and chats? This. Introducing “The Lab” – a YouTube comedy series about grad students working in a science lab. We first came up with this concept about a year ago. After the Banff program, we have all gotten really busy with our lives, jobs, or school work, but the desire to do a project together…

Continue reading


From IFLScience to Vaccination

Recently, an article in the Columbia Journalism Review about “I F*cking Love Science” (IFLS) founder Elise Andrew (@Elise_Andrew) stirred up some controversies (see postscript). In the article by Alexis Sobel Fitts (@fittsofalexis), Andrew was praised for being one of “journalism’s self-made digital-era brands.” If she isn’t already, Andrew is poised to be a new type of media superstar. I will admit that I am not a fan of IFLS. I started out as one though – I enjoyed…

Continue reading


Everyday Science: How to know if your batteries are dead or alive

Running an outreach program, one of the tasks that I get to ask my student assistant to do is to clean up the outreach lab after we run a month of summer camp activities. This involves putting supplies back to their boxes, updating the inventory list so that I can find things around, sharpening all the colour pencils, and…checking whether the batteries are dead of alive. We order batteries in bulk for many of our hands-on electronics activities,…

Continue reading


Within and Beyond Academia – Science Communications Intro for Graduate Students

Natasha and I had often chatted about me running a science communication workshop/presentation for graduate students in the department. A few months ago this became a reality – and it worked quite well since there had been some interests among the students to learn about career paths alternative to an academic one. I put together a fairly short presentation for this purpose. The idea is to talk about the changing landscape of science communication, and to…

Continue reading