Scientists’ SciArt featured by The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA)

Journalist Sara Sneath* of the New Orleans Times-Picayune recently featured ecologists who sketched their study organisms as part of an impromptu, humorous initiative led by Dr. Solomon R. David* (Nicholls State University). Sneath’s front page story details how ecologists responded to the call to sketch their study organism using the MS Paint program and their nondominant hand. My … Continue reading Scientists’ SciArt featured by The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA)

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Laramie Boomerang covers dedication of downtown mural

In spring 2017, I was one of 13 artists commissioned by the Laramie Mural Project to design and paint a component of the expansion of the downtown Laramie “Gill Street” mural. The “Gill Street” mural features fish designed to evoke Wyoming icons. My design depicts a group of five pronghorn along their ~100-mile migration route … Continue reading Laramie Boomerang covers dedication of downtown mural

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Being Second Atop the mountain

Doing research isn’t an easy thing to do. There’s a reason that not everyone is an academic. Trying to bang one’s head up against the wall of science isn’t most people’s idea of a fun time. That being said, when you do get an idea of a direction it can go, it’s exciting. You start gaining momentum, and before you know it, you’ve gotten a paper drafted up. Soon, you will be able to publish…

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Science Communication with Twitter: Tweeting Science to Policymakers

Late last year, my friend, Prof. Shoshanah Jacobs of Guelph University, proposed a panel about Science Twitter for the Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution Annual Meeting that would be happening in July 2018 at Guelph. I immediately agreed, because the other panelists were to include some of Canada’s top ecologists active on social media, […]

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Three things to remember for open-water swimming

Summer can leave you wondering where to swim. In Great Lakes cities you don't have to wander far. You have the privilege of escaping the pool and jumping into the open water. With hundreds of kilometres of Lake Ontario shoreline, the opportunity for open-water swimming is all around you. And jumping in is one of the best ways to get to know your local waters. Here are three things to remember for open-water swimming:1. Check the water…

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Breath of Fresh Air

Wildfires are roaring across much of Western North America. British Columbia has declared a province-wide state of emergency. Whether you are on evacuation alert or a couple of provinces or states away from the fires, the fact that these fires are occurring is inescapable, because the smoke is EVERYWHERE. With all the smoke in the [...] Read More The post Breath of Fresh Air appeared first on Schrodinger's Cat.

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Livin’ on a Prairie

This week on Dispatches from the field, we are excited to welcome back Rachael Bonoan to tell another story of her fieldwork adventures! Except this time instead of working with honey bees, she’s searching for ants and caterpillars. Don’t miss out on the links to her own blog! It’s 6:32 on Saturday morning. Half awake, I hear my phone buzz. Someone emailed me. Do I dare look? I kind of want to sleep in, but…

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Pollen cores to pushing boundaries: who is Margaret B. Davis?

lebeagle: By Katherine Hébert Conferences are simultaneously the worst and best thing about graduate school. They’re the worst if you get nervous about presenting your work in front of researchers you cite all the time, and have placed on a very fancy, divinely-lit academic podium in your brain (this is the case for most graduate students I know). Conferences are also the best, because you can stumble upon some super inspiring things in the whirlwind…

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