Countering a Science Communications Failure

The decisions of Associate Professor R. A. Pyron, to write a perspective piece on extinction and biodiversity, and The Washington Post editors, to publish him, with the headline, "We don’t need to save endangered species. Extinction is part of evolution", have produced what I would label, as a rather large failure of science communication. Geological […]

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JR Profiles Episode 7: Aggeliki Georgiopoulou – Marine Geologist

I got to sit down with science party member Aggeliki Georgiopoulou, a structural geologist from Ireland, to learn about what a marine geologist does. Watch the interview here and learn about geology careers at sea! Aggeliki is originally from Greece and has translated her answers into Greek for us! Πες μας λίγα πράγματα για τον εαυτό σου: Με λένε Αγγελική Γεωργιοπούλου, όλοι με φωνάζουν Άγκυ, που είναι πιο εύκολο για τους μη ελληνόφωνους φίλους και...…

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Read It and Weep: Fungal Guttation

by Jan ThornhillYoung Red-Belted Polypore (Fomitopsis pinicola) with guttation dropsSome fungi are prone to exhibiting a curious phenomenon—they exude beads of moisture, called guttation. In several polypores, such as Fomitopsis pinicola, the liquid produced can look so much like tears that you'd swear the fungus was weeping. Or maybe sweating. Other species produce pigmented drops that can look like milk, or tar, or even blood.Guttation is more well-known in some vascular plants. During the night, when the…

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Researching women botanists in 19th century Ontario brought footnotes back into my life

Investigator-driven research is often highly serendipitous. In high school, I liked history as much as biology, but I'm a fidget, and biology, which is much more action-oriented, allowed me to move more. Also, references were much easier to type for science lab reports and essays, than those fussy footnotes required in history and philosophy. Nearly 40 […]

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Centers for Teaching professional development

Clarifying misconceptions about misconceptions in The Science of Learning by Deans for Impact. (Photo: Peter Newbury) My Centre for Teaching and Learning at UBC Okanagan “supports and promotes teaching and learning excellence, innovation and scholarship.” Many of our programs are offered as a form of professional development for course instructors. After some conversations with senior people here in my Centre – thanks JP and JH – I’ve realized my Centre staff should have professional development…

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