Life at a teaching focused institution is not ‘easier’ – some examples of why

This morning I read the blog at Small Pond Science entitled "Really, faculty jobs in teaching-focused institutions are not inherently less stressful or easier or more balanced".I enjoyed reading this blog because it is true and it reflects my current status. It also speaks to a larger misconception that is often held by other academics, non-academics, administrators and students. I completely agree with the sentiments in the article - being a faculty member at a…

Continue reading


Des facultés cognitives utiles aux échecs… et dans la vie

Si vous êtes un amateur d’échecs comme moi, ou à plus forte raison un joueur ou une joueuse intermédiaire ou expert.e, vous êtes peut-être en retard sur votre journée de travail parce que vous regardez la 8e partie en cours (sur 12) du championnat mondial des échecs opposant le champion en titre depuis 2013, le norvégien Magnus Carlsen à l’aspirant américain Fabiano Caruana, numéro deux mondial. Mais contrairement à vous peut-être, j’ai la chance, grâce…

Continue reading


Monday Quote: California Wildfire Survivors

Today’s quotes are from survivors of California’s deadly wildfires, particularly the Camp Fire, California’s deadliest and most destructive wildfire ever, which devastated the town of Paradise. In the face of such a terrible disaster (80 dead and over 1,200 still missing), it is important to hear the voices of people who have been through it.…

Continue reading


Companion Animal Psychology News November 2018

Women in canine science, people who care for parrots, dogs in Paris, and more... the latest news from Companion Animal Psychology.Some of my favourites from around the web this month"Clearly - dogs are awesome. So is science!" Women are thriving in canine science - tell a girl you know! At Do You Believe in Dog?, Mia Cobb and Julie Hecht are celebrating the women in canine science, and encouraging girls to get interested in a career in…

Continue reading


Interview – Cameron Smith on Evolution and Anthropology

  Jonathan and Chris interview Cameron M. Smith, professor in the department of anthropology at Portland State University. They discuss what is anthropology; what it's like teaching evolution in the United States; what the theory of evolution is; what we've learned from the fossil record; whether or not humans are still evolving; what a hominin is; the revival of Lamarck's theory; and Cameron's real-life adventures on inhospitable terrain and his prediction for humanity's new space…

Continue reading


Models as maps and maps as interfaces

One of my favorite conceptual metaphors from David Basanta is of mathematical models as maps. From this perspective, we as scientists are exploring an unknown realm of our particular domain of study. And we want to share with others what we’ve learned, maybe so that they can follow us, so we build a model. We draw a map. At first, we might not know how to identify prominent landmarks, or orient ourselves in our fields.…

Continue reading