Human Brain Networks Operate on a Unimodal/Multimodal Gradient

This week I’d like to tell you about an article published in the journal PNAS in 2016. It is of interest because it does something that is extremely valuable in the realm of science: it shows how two bodies of data converge into a single phenomenon and thereby helps us to understand some things that were less clear before. Let me explain. The article, by Daniel S. Margulies and no fewer than 11 co-authors, is…

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How do successful academics write? Helen Sword’s “Air & Light & Time & Space” (review)

Helen Sword’s latest book, Air & Light & Time & Space, has a subtitle to make every academic salivate:  How Successful Academics Write.  Who among us wouldn’t like to know that secret?  Who wouldn’t like to know how academics can write more productively, and at the same time, take more pleasure from writing?  After all, […]

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Livin’ on a Prairie

This week on Dispatches from the field, we are excited to welcome back Rachael Bonoan to tell another story of her fieldwork adventures! Except this time instead of working with honey bees, she’s searching for ants and caterpillars. Don’t miss out on the links to her own blog! It’s 6:32 on Saturday morning. Half awake, I hear my phone buzz. Someone emailed me. Do I dare look? I kind of want to sleep in, but…

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Tackling Climate Change

Globally 11 of the last 12 years rank among the 12 warmest since 1850. Greenhouse gas emissions from human activity has led to substantial changes in weather patterns. This temperature increase is being felt around the globe but is greater at higher northern latitudes. These changes will affect ecosystems, the global food supply and ultimately, human health. Genome BC put out a call for research projects which can help us understand climate change impacts and…

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Eight Tips to Help Fearful Dogs Feel Safe

The most important things to know if you have a fearful dog.Photo: Ramon Espelt Photography / Shutterstock1. Recognize that the dog is fearfulThe first step is, of course, to recognize the dog is fearful in the first place.If you know that already, well done for recognizing the signs. Hopefully you will find the following tips helpful.If you aren’t sure, you might like to read how can I tell if my dog is afraid? If the…

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Pollen cores to pushing boundaries: who is Margaret B. Davis?

lebeagle: By Katherine Hébert Conferences are simultaneously the worst and best thing about graduate school. They’re the worst if you get nervous about presenting your work in front of researchers you cite all the time, and have placed on a very fancy, divinely-lit academic podium in your brain (this is the case for most graduate students I know). Conferences are also the best, because you can stumble upon some super inspiring things in the whirlwind…

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Pollen cores to pushing boundaries: who is Margaret B. Davis?

lebeagle: By Katherine Hébert Conferences are simultaneously the worst and best thing about graduate school. They’re the worst if you get nervous about presenting your work in front of researchers you cite all the time, and have placed on a very fancy, divinely-lit academic podium in your brain (this is the case for most graduate students I know). Conferences are also the best, because you can stumble upon some super inspiring things in the whirlwind…

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Insider tips for becoming a PI

Dr. Hannes Röst giving a talk at the University of Toronto. (Credit: Samantha Yammine) You’ve heard the rumours – it is notoriously difficult to get a job as a tenure-track Principal Investigator (PI). The 10,000 PhDs project reported that, on average, about 23 percent of life sciences PhDs from the University of Toronto get a tenure stream position. An interactive mathematical model put forth by David van Dijk et al. a few years ago allows…

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