Ces nombreux événements sans lesquels nous ne serions pas là pour en parler

Comme je l’expliquais la semaine dernière, je vous propose cette semaine un premier billet sur mon cours de la semaine à l’université du troisième âge (UTA), le premier d’une série de huit. Cette séance débute par un bref aperçu des différentes disciplines des sciences dites « cognitives », c’est-à-dire qui s’intéressent à la pensée et à la connaissance humaine au sens large (philosophie, psychologie, neuroscience, linguistique, informatique, anthropologie, etc.). Cela fait à peine quelques décennies…

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Shortlisted for Canada’s Favourite Science Blog

Companion  Animal Psychology is shortlisted for the People's Choice Award: Canada's Favourite Science Blog. Vote for your favourites!I am thrilled to have been short-listed for the People's Choice Award: Canada's Favourite Science Blog.You can see the shortlist and vote here on the Science Borealis website. Voters can select their three favourite blogs and three favourite science websites (so you have six votes in total). It's a great way to show support for your favourite science sites…

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Science Literacy Week 2017: Good Vibrations

Science Literacy Week continues, and today I’m sharing one of my favourite books about communicating science! I first read Ben Goldacre’s Bad Science shortly after it was published in 2008, and gave it a re-read this summer. It’s a truly amazing book for breaking down some of the barriers around understanding the statistical side of … Continue reading Science Literacy Week 2017: Good Vibrations

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Cheapskate Tuesday: (wideish) macro part 1, the 18-55 kit lens

When I have not been blogging for a while, I usually start posts off with a bit of self-flagellation, followed by apologies and a promise to do better in the future. But to heck with that, what about a bit of shameless self-promotion instead? Nah, that does not work either. But something wakens Ibycter from her mighty slumber, and that is as shameful desire to take part in Science Borealis’ People’s Choice Award: Now, for…

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Science Literacy Week 2017: How to Be a Scientist

It’s Science Literacy Week here in Canada, a time to celebrate science communication in all media. For the rest of this week, I’m featuring some of my favourite science books! I’ll also be joining the fun with two talks about our new dinosaur Zuul at the Toronto Public Library, and will be hanging out with … Continue reading Science Literacy Week 2017: How to Be a Scientist

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Miguasha National Park – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 16

I have been slacking a bit (ok a lot) in getting through the 150 things about Canadian palaeo series, but I’m determined to get through 150 facts before the end of this year, while it’s still Canada’s 150th birthday year! For this post, I’m going to focus on Miguasha National Park, located in Quebec, and the 5th (and final) of Canada’s palaeontologically significant UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Starting at 118/150: 118. Located on the Gaspé Peninsula of…

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New Indigenous People & Plants Trail at Royal Botanic Gardens, Hamilton

The new Indigenous People and Plants Trail at the Royal Botanical Gardens, Hamilton, Ontario, opens to the public on Monday 18th September 2017. The trail, located in Cootes Paradise, teaches us about how plants were used by the Anishinaabe people. I found a great journal article about Anishnaabe ethnobotany in NW Ontario, by Davidson-Hunt, Jack, Mandamin & […]

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