First core on deck

We made it to our first drill site! Because we are drilling about 1,600 feet (that’s about 500 metres) below the sea floor, it takes a few hours to get the drill string down to the sea floor to begin coring. After that, 31 ft (or 9.6 metre) sections of cores begin coming up every 40 minutes or so. The core is brought on deck, we let it sit for about 4 hours so it...…

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The things we do…

My advisor has always maintained that a field crew runs on its stomach.  In other words, well-fed field assistants are much happier and much more productive – not to mention much less likely to mutiny. There is no doubt that this is true.  Trying to run a field crew without an adequate supply of coffee, chocolate, or wine is an enterprise doomed to failure.  But – at the risk of disagreeing with my advisor –…

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Where did all the tail clubs go?

Today is a New Paper Day! This time, we’re talking about the evolution of tail weapons! (Two Ankylosaurus duke it out with their tail clubs. (c) Jack Mayer Wood, used with permission) Readers of this blog will not be surprised to know that I find ankylosaur tail clubs quite interesting. I’ve been lucky to get … Continue reading Where did all the tail clubs go?

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Life onboard our polar expedition

Much has happened in our 8 day transit from New Zealand to Antarctica. We learned about each other’s science and how we will work together in the coming weeks, hearing talks and taking tours. We crossed the Antarctic Circle and the Prime Meridian, and celebrated co-chief scientist Rob McKay’s birthday with a surprise party. Some were seasick through the Southern Ocean waves but we all made it. The Nathaniel B. Palmer escorted us through some...…

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Life onboard our polar expedition

Much has happened in our 8 day transit from New Zealand to Antarctica. We learned about each other’s science and how we will work together in the coming weeks, hearing talks and taking tours. We crossed the Antarctic Circle and the Prime Meridian, and celebrated co-chief scientist Rob McKay’s birthday with a surprise party. Meals have been good, the gym frequented, sleep cherished. And during the transit we settled into life aboard ship. The ship...…

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Sprinkling some Grains of Salt on Ice Bridge

Pic: Still from the documentary On January 14th, 2018, the popular CBC program “The Nature of Things” aired an hour-long documentary titled, Ice Bridge. This documentary sought out to explore in detail the Solutrean Hypothesis, the brain-child of archaeologists Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley. Well, in fairness the hypothesis came about in the 1930’s but quickly died out. Stanford and Bradley have since resurrected it. This hypothesis states that the first people to settle in the…

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