Case closed(ish): Shutting the door on the Toronto sewage bypass alerts

Aerial view of Humber Bay Treatment Plant after a rainstorm.  Massive amounts of rain fell on Toronto in one hour back in July, 2013. The deluge overwhelmed city infrastructure and knocked out power to at least one wastewater treatment plant. The city dumped more than 1-billion litres of raw sewage into Lake Ontario in a single day.Lake Ontario Waterkeeper responded to the flood by sampling recreational water spots around the city and working with local…

Continue reading


Fabric Fun – Making Embroidered Microfossils

Microfossils are exactly what they sound like – tiny fossils! There are several different subcategories: foraminifera, radiolaria, and nannofossils. Micropaleonologists find these microfossils in the core the JOIDES Resolution collects from the Earth’s crust. Micro means small so most of the microfossils must be seen through a microscope. Although the fossilized shells show up as white now, they used to be all kinds of colours when the organisms were still living. We have a new...…

Continue reading


That’s a Wrap – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 19, THE END!

Well we’re finally here, only a few months late, at my final post and final 9 bits about Canadian palaeontology. For my last post, I’m going to focus on Saskatchewan and Yukon, two areas I managed to ignore a bit through my previous posts. These are by no means less interesting or important that what I’ve talked about, just slipped my mind and couldn’t figure out where to fit things in. So without further delay,…

Continue reading


JR Book Club with Alyssa

Alyssa is the publications specialist for Expedition 369. She is responsible for collecting and organizing the publications as well as creating visual core descriptions (graphical representations) of the described core data. When she is not sailing on the JR, she works in the IODP offices at Texas A&M. Here’s what she had to say about the book she’s been reading: “I’ve just finished reading The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins- a book written in the...…

Continue reading


Sailing the Racetrack Playa of Death Valley, California

Have you heard of “sliding stones”? These are moving rocks that mysteriously move across the surface of the Racetrack Playa, a seasonally dry lake (or playa) in the Panamint Mountains, Death Valley National Park. Most of the racetrack rocks originate from the nearby hillside of a dark dolomite on the south end of the playa. As they move without human intervention, the rocks leave long tracks behind them, often tens of hundreds of feet and…

Continue reading


Episode 1: Doing Research in the Sahtú Region of the Mackenzie Mountains

  The first episode of the Canadian Mountain Podcast features a panel discussion on past and current research projects in the Sahtú region of Canada’s Northwest Territories. Hosted by writer and naturalist Ben Gadd, a diverse panel of research professionals discusses the challenges and rewards that conducting work in such a remote region entails. Guests: Leon Andrew, Tom Andrews, Heather Sayine, and Deborah Simmons. The post Episode 1: Doing Research in the Sahtú Region of…

Continue reading