Science Literacy Week 2017: Good Vibrations

Science Literacy Week continues, and today I’m sharing one of my favourite books about communicating science! I first read Ben Goldacre’s Bad Science shortly after it was published in 2008, and gave it a re-read this summer. It’s a truly amazing book for breaking down some of the barriers around understanding the statistical side of … Continue reading Science Literacy Week 2017: Good Vibrations

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Job Posting: Great Lakes Guide Project Lead

Swim Drink Fish Canada is looking for a full-time project lead to oversee the development and launch of a new web project dedicated to promoting and protecting the Great Lakes. The project lead reports directly to the Vice President. The position is open as of October 1, 2017.The ideal project lead is someone who has a deep passion for the history, ecology, and unique economic potential of the Great Lakes region in addition to practical…

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Science Literacy Week 2017: How to Be a Scientist

It’s Science Literacy Week here in Canada, a time to celebrate science communication in all media. For the rest of this week, I’m featuring some of my favourite science books! I’ll also be joining the fun with two talks about our new dinosaur Zuul at the Toronto Public Library, and will be hanging out with … Continue reading Science Literacy Week 2017: How to Be a Scientist

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Miguasha National Park – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 16

I have been slacking a bit (ok a lot) in getting through the 150 things about Canadian palaeo series, but I’m determined to get through 150 facts before the end of this year, while it’s still Canada’s 150th birthday year! For this post, I’m going to focus on Miguasha National Park, located in Quebec, and the 5th (and final) of Canada’s palaeontologically significant UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Starting at 118/150: 118. Located on the Gaspé Peninsula of…

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Weekend reads

More to read including some from the rather large backlog. Have a great weekend with some good reads.Escaping introns in COI through cDNA barcoding of mushrooms: Pleurotus as a test case.DNA barcoding involves the use of one or more short, standardized DNA fragments for the rapid identification of species. A 648-bp segment near the 5' terminus of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene has been adopted as the universal DNA barcode for…

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